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Energy expenditure and personality in wild chipmunks

Careau, Vincent, Montiglio, Pierre-Olivier, Garant, Dany, Pelletier, Fanie, Speakman, John R., Humphries, Murray M. and Réale, Denis 2015, Energy expenditure and personality in wild chipmunks, Behavioral ecology and sociobiology, vol. 69, no. 4, pp. 653-661.

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Title Energy expenditure and personality in wild chipmunks
Author(s) Careau, Vincent
Montiglio, Pierre-Olivier
Garant, Dany
Pelletier, Fanie
Speakman, John R.
Humphries, Murray M.
Réale, Denis
Journal name Behavioral ecology and sociobiology
Volume number 69
Issue number 4
Start page 653
End page 661
Total pages 9
Publisher Springer
Place of publication Berlin, Germany
Publication date 2015-01-01
ISSN 0340-5443
Keyword(s) Doubly-labeled water
FMR
Pace of life
Repeatability
Temperament
Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Behavioral Sciences
Ecology
Zoology
Environmental Sciences & Ecology
Doubly-labeledwater
BASAL METABOLIC-RATE
RANGING EASTERN CHIPMUNKS
AMERICAN RED SQUIRRELS
OPEN-FIELD BEHAVIOR
TAMIAS-STRIATUS
EXPLORATORY-BEHAVIOR
INDIVIDUAL VARIATION
MUROID RODENTS
LIFE-HISTORY
Summary © 2015, Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg. According to the “pace-of-life syndrome” concept, slow-fast life-history strategies favored under different ecological conditions should lead to co-adaptations between metabolic rate and personality traits such as activity, exploration, and boldness. Although the relationships between resting metabolic rate (RMR) and personality traits have been recently tested several times, we still do not know whether personality is related to the daily energy expenditure (DEE) of free-living individuals in their natural habitat. The objectives of this study were to assess the links between RMR, DEE, and two personality traits (exploration in an open-field and docility during handling) in wild eastern chipmunks (Tamias striatus). Using a multivariate mixed model, we found that exploration and docility were significantly correlated at the among-individual level, confirming the presence of a behavioral syndrome within our population. We also found that exploration, but not docility, was negatively correlated with DEE. Hence, fast explorers show lower DEE levels than slow explorers, independently of RMR and docility. This result adds to an increasingly large (and complex) literature reporting the impacts of personality traits on the biology, ecology, and physiology of animals in their natural environment.
Language eng
Field of Research 060201 Behavioural Ecology
06 Biological Sciences
05 Environmental Sciences
07 Agricultural And Veterinary Sciences
Socio Economic Objective 970106 Expanding Knowledge in the Biological Sciences
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30077955

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