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Spinal immobilisaton in pre-hospital and emergency care: A systematic review of the literature

Hood, Natalie and Considine, Julie 2015, Spinal immobilisaton in pre-hospital and emergency care: A systematic review of the literature, Australasian emergency nursing journal, vol. 18, no. 3, pp. 118-137.

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Title Spinal immobilisaton in pre-hospital and emergency care: A systematic review of the literature
Author(s) Hood, Natalie
Considine, JulieORCID iD for Considine, Julie orcid.org/0000-0003-3801-2456
Journal name Australasian emergency nursing journal
Volume number 18
Issue number 3
Start page 118
End page 137
Total pages 20
Publisher Elsevier
Place of publication Amsterdam, The Netherlands
Publication date 2015-06-04
ISSN 1574-6267
Keyword(s) Emergency nursing
Evidence-based practice
Spinal injury
Systematic review
Trauma
Summary Background: Spinal immobilisation has been a mainstay of trauma care for decades and is based on the premise that immobilisation will prevent further neurological compromise in patients with a spinal column injury. The aim of this systematic review was to examine the evidence related to spinal immobilisation in pre-hospital and emergency care settings. Methods: In February 2015, we performed a systematic literature review of English language publications from 1966 to January 2015 indexed in MEDLINE and Cochrane library using the following search terms: 'spinal injuries' OR 'spinal cord injuries' AND 'emergency treatment' OR 'emergency care' OR 'first aid' AND immobilisation. EMBASE was searched for keywords 'spinal injury OR 'spinal cord injury' OR 'spine fracture AND 'emergency care' OR 'prehospital care'. Results: There were 47 studies meeting inclusion criteria for further review. Ten studies were case series (level of evidence IV) and there were 37 studies from which data were extrapolated from healthy volunteers, cadavers or multiple trauma patients. There were 15 studies that were supportive, 13 studies that were neutral, and 19 studies opposing spinal immobilisation. Conclusion: There are no published high-level studies that assess the efficacy of spinal immobilisation in pre-hospital and emergency care settings. Almost all of the current evidence is related to spinal immobilisation is extrapolated data, mostly from healthy volunteers.
Language eng
Field of Research 111003 Clinical Nursing: Secondary (Acute Care)
111099 Nursing not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 920210 Nursing
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30077983

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Nursing and Midwifery
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Created: Thu, 10 Dec 2015, 11:25:33 EST

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