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Cycling as a part of daily life: A review of health perspectives

Götschi, Thomas, Garrard, Jan and Giles-Corti, Billie 2016, Cycling as a part of daily life: A review of health perspectives, Transport reviews, vol. 36, no. 1, Issue : Cycling As Transport, pp. 45-71, doi: 10.1080/01441647.2015.1057877.

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Title Cycling as a part of daily life: A review of health perspectives
Author(s) Götschi, Thomas
Garrard, Jan
Giles-Corti, Billie
Journal name Transport reviews
Volume number 36
Issue number 1
Season Issue : Cycling As Transport
Start page 45
End page 71
Total pages 28
Publisher Taylor & Francis
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2016
ISSN 0144-1647
1464-5327
Keyword(s) bicycling
physical activity
safety
air pollution
impact assessment
health benefits
Summary Health aspects of day-to-day cycling have gained attention from the health sector aiming to increase levels of physical activity, and from the transport and planning sector, to justify investments in cycling. We review and discuss the main pathways between cycling and health under two perspectives — generalizable epidemiological evidence for health effects and specific impact modeling to quantify health impacts in concrete settings. Substantial benefits from physical activity dominate the public health impacts of cycling. Epidemiological evidence is strong and impact modeling is well advanced. Injuries amount to a smaller impact on the population level, but affect crash victims disproportionately and perceived risks deter potential cyclists. Basic data on crash risks are available, but evidence on determinants of risks is limited and impact models are highly dependent on local factors. Risks from air pollution can be assumed to be small, with limited evidence for cycling-specific mechanisms. Based on a large body of evidence, planners, health professionals, and decision-makers can rest assured that benefits from cycling-related physical activity are worth pursuing. Safety improvements should be part of the efforts to promote cycling, both to minimize negative impacts and to lower barriers to cycling for potential riders.
Language eng
DOI 10.1080/01441647.2015.1057877
Field of Research 1205 Urban And Regional Planning
1507 Transportation And Freight Services
Socio Economic Objective 920599 Specific Population Health (excl. Indigenous Health) not elsewhere classified
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2015, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30078063

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Health and Social Development
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Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 9 times in TR Web of Science
Scopus Citation Count Cited 9 times in Scopus
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Created: Wed, 06 Jan 2016, 10:11:51 EST

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.