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Game and training load differences in elite junior Australian football

Henderson, Brendan, Cook, Jill, Kidgell, Dawson J. and Gastin, Paul B. 2015, Game and training load differences in elite junior Australian football, Journal of sports science and medicine, vol. 14, no. 3, pp. 494-500.

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Title Game and training load differences in elite junior Australian football
Author(s) Henderson, Brendan
Cook, Jill
Kidgell, Dawson J.
Gastin, Paul B.ORCID iD for Gastin, Paul B. orcid.org/0000-0003-2320-7875
Journal name Journal of sports science and medicine
Volume number 14
Issue number 3
Start page 494
End page 500
Total pages 7
Publisher University of Uludag
Place of publication Bursa, Turkey
Publication date 2015-09
ISSN 1303-2968
Keyword(s) Adolescent
GPS
rating of perceived exertion
time motion analysis
training prescription
youth athlete
Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Sport Sciences
RUGBY UNION PLAYERS
MATCH RUNNING PERFORMANCE
BASKETBALL PLAYERS
AFL FOOTBALL
PHYSIOLOGICAL DEMANDS
RULES FOOTBALLERS
MOVEMENT DEMANDS
SOCCER PLAYERS
FITNESS
COMPETITION
Summary Game demands and training practices within team sports such as Australian football (AF) have changed considerably over recent decades, including the requirement of coaching staff to effectively control, manipulate and monitor training and competition loads. The purpose of this investigation was to assess the differences in external and internal physical load measures between game and training in elite junior AF. Twenty five male, adolescent players (mean ±SD: age 17.6 ± 0.5 y) recruited from three elite under 18 AF clubs participated. Global positioning system (GPS), heart rate (HR) and rating of perceived exertion (RPE) data were obtained from 32 game files during four games, and 84 training files during 19 training sessions. Matched-pairs statistics along with Cohen's d effect size and percent difference were used to compare game and training events. Players were exposed to a higher physical load in the game environment, for both external (GPS) and internal (HR, Session-RPE) load parameters, compared to in-season training. Session time (d = 1.23; percent difference = 31.4% (95% confidence intervals = 17.4 - 45.4)), total distance (3.5; 63.5% (17.4 - 45.4)), distance per minute (1.93; 33.0% (25.8 - 40.1)), high speed distance (2.24; 77.3% (60.3 - 94.2)), number of sprints (0.94; 43.6% (18.9 - 68.6)), mean HR (1.83; 14.3% (10.5 - 18.1)), minutes spent above 80% of predicted HRmax (2.65; 103.7% (89.9 - 117.6)) and Session-RPE (1.22; 48.1% (22.1 - 74.1)) were all higher in competition compared to training. While training should not be expected to fully replicate competition, the observed differences suggest that monitoring of physical load in both environments is warranted to allow comparisons and evaluate whether training objectives are being met. Key pointsPhysical loads, including intensity, are typically lower in training compared to competition in junior elite Australian football.Monitoring of player loads in team sports should include both internal and external measures.Selected training drills should look to replicate game intensities, however training is unlikely to match the overall physical demands of competition.
Language eng
Field of Research 110699 Human Movement and Sports Science not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 920599 Specific Population Health (excl. Indigenous Health) not elsewhere classified
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2015, University of Uludag
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30078064

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.