You are not logged in.

Cultural and social factors and quality of life of Maori in advanced age. Te puawaitanga o nga tapuwae kia ora tonu - Life and living in advanced age: a cohort study in New Zealand (LiLACS NZ)

Dyall, Lorna, Kepa, Mere, Teh, Ruth, Mules, Rangimarie, Moyes, Simon A., Wham, Carol, Hayman, Karen, Connolly, Martin, Wilkinson, Tim, Keeling, Sally, Loughlin, Hine, Jatrana, Santosh and Kerse, Ngaire 2014, Cultural and social factors and quality of life of Maori in advanced age. Te puawaitanga o nga tapuwae kia ora tonu - Life and living in advanced age: a cohort study in New Zealand (LiLACS NZ), New Zealand medical journal, vol. 127, no. 1393, pp. 62-79.

Attached Files
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads

Title Cultural and social factors and quality of life of Maori in advanced age. Te puawaitanga o nga tapuwae kia ora tonu - Life and living in advanced age: a cohort study in New Zealand (LiLACS NZ)
Author(s) Dyall, Lorna
Kepa, Mere
Teh, Ruth
Mules, Rangimarie
Moyes, Simon A.
Wham, Carol
Hayman, Karen
Connolly, Martin
Wilkinson, Tim
Keeling, Sally
Loughlin, Hine
Jatrana, Santosh
Kerse, Ngaire
Journal name New Zealand medical journal
Volume number 127
Issue number 1393
Start page 62
End page 79
Total pages 18
Publisher New Zealand Medical Association
Place of publication Wellington, N.Z.
Publication date 2014-05-02
ISSN 1175-8716
Keyword(s) aging
cross-sectional studies
cultural characteristics
New Zealand
Oceanic Ancestry Group
quality of life
social support
socioeconomic factors
surveys and questionnaires
Summary AIM: To establish 1) the socioeconomic and cultural profile and 2) correlates of quality of life (QOL) of Maori in advanced age. METHOD: A cross sectional survey of a population based cohort of Maori aged 80-90 years, participants in LiLACS NZ, in the Rotorua and Bay of Plenty region of New Zealand. Socioeconomic and cultural engagement characteristics were established by personal interview and QOL was assessed by the SF-12. RESULTS: In total 421 (56%) participated and 267 (63%) completed the comprehensive interview. Maori lived with high deprivation areas and had received a poor education in the public system. Home ownership was high (81%), 64% had more than 3 children still living and social support was present for practical tasks and emotional support in 82%. A need for more practical help was reported by 21%. Fifty-two percent of the participants used te reo Maori me nga tikanga (Maori language and culture) daily. One in five had experienced discrimination and one in five reported colonisation affecting their life today. Greater frequency of visits to marae/sacred gathering places was associated with higher physical health-related QOL. Unmet need for practical help was associated with lower physical health-related QOL. Lower mental health-related QOL was associated with having experienced discrimination. CONCLUSION: Greater language and cultural engagement is associated with higher QOL for older Maori and unmet social needs and discrimination are associated with lower QOL.
Language eng
Field of Research 111799 Public Health and Health Services not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 940204 Public Services Policy Advice and Analysis
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2014, NZMA
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30078102

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: Alfred Deakin Research Institute
Connect to link resolver
 
Unless expressly stated otherwise, the copyright for items in DRO is owned by the author, with all rights reserved.

Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 0 times in TR Web of Science
Scopus Citation Count Cited 10 times in Scopus
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Access Statistics: 33 Abstract Views, 0 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Mon, 07 Sep 2015, 12:34:32 EST

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.