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The role of cognitions and beliefs in trichotillomania: a qualitative study using interpretative phenomenological analysis

Rehm, Imogen C., Nedeljkovic, Maja, Thomas, Anna and Moulding, Richard 2015, The role of cognitions and beliefs in trichotillomania: a qualitative study using interpretative phenomenological analysis, Behaviour change, vol. 32, no. 4, pp. 209-230, doi: 10.1017/bec.2015.11.

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Title The role of cognitions and beliefs in trichotillomania: a qualitative study using interpretative phenomenological analysis
Author(s) Rehm, Imogen C.
Nedeljkovic, Maja
Thomas, Anna
Moulding, RichardORCID iD for Moulding, Richard orcid.org/0000-0001-7779-3166
Journal name Behaviour change
Volume number 32
Issue number 4
Start page 209
End page 230
Total pages 23
Publisher Cambridge University Press (CUP)
Place of publication Cambridge, Eng.
Publication date 2015
ISSN 0813-4839
2049-7768
Summary Trichotillomania (TTM) is characterised by the removal of one's hair, causing hair loss. Phenomenological research on TTM has investigated its associated behavioural and affective factors. Few studies have investigated the possible role of cognitions and beliefs, despite emerging support for cognitive therapies in treating this disorder. This study aimed to explore and describe the cognitions and beliefs that contribute to the onset and maintenance of hairpulling in TTM. Eight women with TTM participated in semi-structured, in-depth interviews to explore their experience of cognitions and beliefs before, during and after typical hairpulling episodes. Interviews were analysed using the qualitative method of Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis. Six superordinate themes of beliefs were identified as important: negative self-beliefs, control beliefs, beliefs about coping, beliefs about negative emotions, permission-giving beliefs, and perfectionism. These preliminary findings suggest that cognitions may play an important role in TTM phenomenology. Future quantitative research on the role of cognitions and beliefs in TTM in larger samples has the potential to advance cognitive-behavioural models and treatments of this poorly understood disorder.
Language eng
DOI 10.1017/bec.2015.11
Field of Research 170106 Health, Clinical and Counselling Psychology
Socio Economic Objective 920410 Mental Health
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2015, Cambridge University Press (CUP)
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30078158

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Psychology
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