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Protein requirements and recommendations for older people: a review

Nowson, Caryl and O'Connell, Stella 2015, Protein requirements and recommendations for older people: a review, Nutrients, vol. 7, no. 8, pp. 6874-6899, doi: 10.3390/nu7085311.

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Title Protein requirements and recommendations for older people: a review
Author(s) Nowson, CarylORCID iD for Nowson, Caryl orcid.org/0000-0001-6586-7965
O'Connell, Stella
Journal name Nutrients
Volume number 7
Issue number 8
Start page 6874
End page 6899
Total pages 26
Publisher MDPI
Place of publication Basel, Switzerland
Publication date 2015
ISSN 2072-6643
Keyword(s) elderly
function
muscle
protein requirements
strength
Summary Declines in skeletal muscle mass and strength are major contributors to increased mortality, morbidity and reduced quality of life in older people. Recommended Dietary Allowances/Intakes have failed to adequately consider the protein requirements of the elderly with respect to function. The aim of this paper was to review definitions of optimal protein status and the evidence base for optimal dietary protein. Current recommended protein intakes for older people do not account for the compensatory loss of muscle mass that occurs on lower protein intakes. Older people have lower rates of protein synthesis and whole-body proteolysis in response to an anabolic stimulus (food or resistance exercise). Recommendations for the level of adequate dietary intake of protein for older people should be informed by evidence derived from functional outcomes. Randomized controlled trials report a clear benefit of increased dietary protein on lean mass gain and leg strength, particularly when combined with resistance exercise. There is good consistent evidence (level III-2 to IV) that consumption of 1.0 to 1.3 g/kg/day dietary protein combined with twice-weekly progressive resistance exercise reduces age-related muscle mass loss. Older people appear to require 1.0 to 1.3 g/kg/day dietary protein to optimize physical function, particularly whilst undertaking resistance exercise recommendations.
Language eng
DOI 10.3390/nu7085311
Field of Research 090899 Food Sciences not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 920502 Health Related to Ageing
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2015, MDPI
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30078166

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.