You are not logged in.

Thermal comfort of multiple user groups in indoor aquatic centres

Rajagopalan, Priyadarsini and Jamei, Elmira 2015, Thermal comfort of multiple user groups in indoor aquatic centres, Energy and buildings, vol. 105, pp. 129-138, doi: 10.1016/j.enbuild.2015.07.037.

Attached Files
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads

Title Thermal comfort of multiple user groups in indoor aquatic centres
Author(s) Rajagopalan, Priyadarsini
Jamei, Elmira
Journal name Energy and buildings
Volume number 105
Start page 129
End page 138
Total pages 10
Publisher Elsevier
Place of publication Amsterdam, The Netherlands
Publication date 2015
ISSN 0378-7788
1872-6178
Keyword(s) Science & Technology
Technology
Construction & Building Technology
Energy & Fuels
Engineering, Civil
Engineering
aquatic centre
energy
thermal comfort
survey
objective measurements
user groups
SICK BUILDING SYNDROME
SPORTS FACILITIES
ENVIRONMENT
QUALITY
Summary Aquatic centres are popular recreational facilities in Australia and other developed countries. These buildings have experienced exponential demand over the past few decades. The growing desire for better indoor environmental quality in aquatic centres has resulted in a marked increase in energy consumption in this sector. With the existence of multiple user groups, achieving thermal comfort has always been challenging. Even though several thermal comfort studies are conducted in other building types, such studies are very limited with respect to aquatic centres. This paper analyses the thermal comfort conditions of various user groups in seven aquatic centres in Australia. Comfort measurements are performed through monitoring environmental parameters and surveying swimmers, staff and spectators. The results revealed the variation of air temperatures among the buildings, resulting in high level of thermal discomfort for the spectators and staff in some of the buildings. The thermal sensation of the staff and spectators had good correlation with the indoor temperatures and PMVs. Altering temperature settings according to the seasons will help to improve the comfort with respect to the adaptation and expectation of the occupants.
Language eng
DOI 10.1016/j.enbuild.2015.07.037
Field of Research 120202 Building Science and Techniques
Socio Economic Objective 970112 Expanding Knowledge in Built Environment and Design
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2015, Elsevier
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30078177

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Architecture and Built Environment
Connect to link resolver
 
Unless expressly stated otherwise, the copyright for items in DRO is owned by the author, with all rights reserved.

Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 3 times in TR Web of Science
Scopus Citation Count Cited 2 times in Scopus
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Access Statistics: 53 Abstract Views, 2 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Tue, 10 Nov 2015, 17:33:27 EST

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.