Spirituality, religion, social support and health among older Australian adults

Moxey, Annette, McEvoy, Mark, Bowe, Steven and Attia, John 2011, Spirituality, religion, social support and health among older Australian adults, Australasian journal on ageing, vol. 30, no. 2, pp. 82-88, doi: 10.1111/j.1741-6612.2010.00453.x.

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Title Spirituality, religion, social support and health among older Australian adults
Author(s) Moxey, Annette
McEvoy, Mark
Bowe, StevenORCID iD for Bowe, Steven orcid.org/0000-0003-3813-842X
Attia, John
Journal name Australasian journal on ageing
Volume number 30
Issue number 2
Start page 82
End page 88
Total pages 7
Publisher Wiley
Place of publication Melbourne, Vic.
Publication date 2011-06
ISSN 1741-6612
Keyword(s) Adaptation, Psychological
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aging
Comorbidity
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Health Status
Health Surveys
Humans
Linear Models
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
New South Wales
Odds Ratio
Religion
Social Support
Spirituality
Summary AIM: To examine the impact of perceived importance of spirituality or religion (ISR) and religious service attendance (RSA) on health and well-being in older Australians. METHODS: A cross-sectional survey of 752 community-dwelling men and women aged 55-85 years from the Hunter Region, New South Wales. RESULTS: Overall, 51% of participants felt spirituality or religion was important in their lives and 24% attended religious services at least 2-3 times a month. In univariate regression analyses, ISR and RSA were associated with increased levels of social support (P < 0.001). However, ISR was also associated with more comorbidities (incidence-rate ratio= 1.2, 95% confidence interval 1.08-1.33). There were no statistically significant associations between ISR or RSA and other measures such as mental and physical health. CONCLUSION: Spirituality and religious involvement have a beneficial impact on older Australians' perceptions of social support, and may enable individuals to better cope with the presence of multiple comorbidities later in life.
Language eng
DOI 10.1111/j.1741-6612.2010.00453.x
Field of Research 119999 Medical and Health Sciences not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 929999 Health not elsewhere classified
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2011, Wiley
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30078269

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: Faculty of Health
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