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Alcohol-related crime in city entertainment precincts: Public perception and experience of alcohol-related crime and support for strategies to reduce such crime

Tindall, Jenny, Groombridge, Daniel, Wiggers, John, Gillham, Karen, Palmer, Darren, Clinton-McHarg, Tara, Lecathelinais, Christophe and Miller, Peter 2016, Alcohol-related crime in city entertainment precincts: Public perception and experience of alcohol-related crime and support for strategies to reduce such crime, Drug and alcohol review, vol. 35, no. 3, pp. 263-272, doi: 10.1111/dar.12314.

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Title Alcohol-related crime in city entertainment precincts: Public perception and experience of alcohol-related crime and support for strategies to reduce such crime
Author(s) Tindall, Jenny
Groombridge, Daniel
Wiggers, John
Gillham, Karen
Palmer, Darren
Clinton-McHarg, Tara
Lecathelinais, Christophe
Miller, PeterORCID iD for Miller, Peter orcid.org/0000-0002-6896-5437
Journal name Drug and alcohol review
Volume number 35
Issue number 3
Start page 263
End page 272
Total pages 10
Publisher Wiley
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2016-05
ISSN 1465-3362
Keyword(s) Australia
alcohol
attitude
harm reduction
violence
Summary INTRODUCTION AND AIMS: Bars, pubs and taverns in cities are often concentrated in entertainment precincts that are associated with higher rates of alcohol-related crime. This study assessed public perception and experiences of such crime in two city entertainment precincts, and support for alcohol-related crime reduction strategies. DESIGN AND METHODS: A cross-sectional household telephone survey in two Australian regions assessed: perception and experiences of crime; support for crime reduction strategies; and differences in such perceptions and support. RESULTS: Six hundred ninety-four people completed the survey (32%). Most agreed that alcohol was a problem in their entertainment precinct (90%) with violence the most common alcohol-related problem reported (97%). Almost all crime reduction strategies were supported by more than 50% of participants, including visitors to the entertainment precincts, with the latter being slightly less likely to support earlier closing and restrictions on premises density. Participants in one region were more likely to support earlier closing and lock-out times. Those at-risk of acute alcohol harm were less likely to support more restrictive policies. DISCUSSION AND CONCLUSIONS: High levels of community concern and support for alcohol harm-reduction strategies, including restrictive strategies, provide policy makers with a basis for implementing evidence-based strategies to reduce such harms in city entertainment precincts. [Tindall J, Groombridge D, Wiggers J, Gillham K, Palmer D, Clinton-McHarg T, Lecathelinais C, Miller P. Alcohol-related crime in city entertainment precincts: Public perception and experience of alcohol-related crime and support for strategies to reduce such crime. Drug Alcohol Rev 2015].
Language eng
DOI 10.1111/dar.12314
Field of Research 170106 Health, Clinical and Counselling Psychology
Socio Economic Objective 920414 Substance Abuse
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2016, Wiley
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30078284

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Psychology
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