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The health and economic benefits of reducing intimate partner violence: an Australian example.

Cadilhac, Dominique A., Sheppard, Lauren, Cumming, Toby B., Thayabaranathan, Tharshanah, Pearce, Dora C., Carter, Rob and Magnus, Anne 2015, The health and economic benefits of reducing intimate partner violence: an Australian example., BMC public health, vol. 15, no. 625, pp. 1-10, doi: 10.1186/s12889-015-1931-y.

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Title The health and economic benefits of reducing intimate partner violence: an Australian example.
Author(s) Cadilhac, Dominique A.
Sheppard, Lauren
Cumming, Toby B.
Thayabaranathan, Tharshanah
Pearce, Dora C.
Carter, RobORCID iD for Carter, Rob orcid.org/0000-0002-1586-5619
Magnus, Anne
Journal name BMC public health
Volume number 15
Issue number 625
Start page 1
End page 10
Total pages 10
Publisher BioMed Central
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2015
ISSN 1471-2458
Keyword(s) Australia
Cost-benefit analysis
Economic models
Female
Health care costs
Intimate partner violence
Mortality
Quality-adjusted life years
Risk reduction behaviour
Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Public, Environmental & Occupational Health
PSYCHOLOGICAL DISTRESS
INDIRECT COSTS
RISK-FACTORS
DISEASE
PREVALENCE
BURDEN
WOMEN
Summary BACKGROUND: Intimate partner violence (IPV) has important impacts on the health of women in society. Our aim was to estimate the health and economic benefits of reducing the prevalence of IPV in the 2008 Australian female adult population. METHODS: Simulation models were developed to show the effect of a 5 percentage point absolute feasible reduction target in the prevalence of IPV from current Australian levels (27%). IPV is not measured in national surveys. Levels of psychological distress were used as a proxy for exposure to IPV since psychological conditions represent three-quarters of the disease burden from IPV. Lifetime cohort health benefits for females were estimated as fewer incident cases of violence-related disease and injury; deaths; and Disability Adjusted Life Years (DALYs). Opportunity cost savings were estimated for the health sector, paid and unpaid production and leisure from reduced incidence of IPV-related disease and deaths. Workforce production gains were estimated by comparing surveyed participation and absenteeism rates of females with moderate psychological distress (lifetime IPV exposure) against high or very high distress (current IPV exposure), and valued using the friction cost approach (FCA). The impact of improved health status on unpaid household production and leisure time were modelled from time use survey data. Potential costs associated with interventions to reduce IPV were not considered. Multivariable uncertainty analyses and univariable sensitivity analyses were undertaken. RESULTS: A 5 percentage point absolute reduction in the lifetime prevalence of IPV in the 2008 Australian female population was estimated to produce 6000 fewer incident cases of disease/injury, 74 fewer deaths, 5000 fewer DALYs lost and provide gains of 926,000 working days, 371,000 days of home-based production and 428,000 leisure days. Overall, AUD371 million in opportunity cost savings could be achievable. The greatest economic savings would be home-based production (AUD147 million), followed by leisure time (AUD98 million), workforce production (AUD94 million) and reduced health sector costs (AUD38 million). CONCLUSIONS: This study contributes new knowledge about the economic impact of IPV in females. The findings provide evidence of large potential opportunity cost savings from reducing the prevalence of IPV and reinforce the need to reduce IPV in Australia, and elsewhere.
Language eng
DOI 10.1186/s12889-015-1931-y
Field of Research 140208 Health Economics
Socio Economic Objective 920507 Women's Health
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2015, BioMed Central
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30078354

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Faculty of Health
Population Health
Open Access Collection
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.