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A preliminary adaptation of the Problem Gambling Severity Index for Indigenous Australians: internal reliability and construct validity

Bertossa, Sue, Harvey, Peter, Smith, David and Chong, Alwin 2014, A preliminary adaptation of the Problem Gambling Severity Index for Indigenous Australians: internal reliability and construct validity, Australian and New Zealand journal of public health, vol. 38, no. 4, pp. 349-354, doi: 10.1111/1753-6405.12254.

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Title A preliminary adaptation of the Problem Gambling Severity Index for Indigenous Australians: internal reliability and construct validity
Author(s) Bertossa, Sue
Harvey, PeterORCID iD for Harvey, Peter orcid.org/0000-0003-2983-663X
Smith, David
Chong, Alwin
Journal name Australian and New Zealand journal of public health
Volume number 38
Issue number 4
Start page 349
End page 354
Total pages 6
Publisher Wiley
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2014-08
ISSN 1753-6405
Summary Objective: This paper describes the process employed to adapt the Problem Gambling Severity Index (PGSI) for use with Indigenous Australian populations.Methods: This study comprised a two-stage process: an initial consultation with Indigenous health workers, informing the textual and conceptual adaptation of items, followed by trial of the adjusted instrument with Indigenous community members (n=301).Results: Internal reliability was demonstrated: Australian Indigenous Problem Gambling Index (AIPGI) Cronbach's alpha α = 0.92 (Original PGSI, α = 0.84). Item-rest correlations confirmed that responses to items were consistent and related to the total score of remaining items. The AIPGI could predict gambling severity based on gambling frequency, when controlling for age and gender (OR=1.28, 95%CI 1.17–1.40).Conclusions: The adapted instrument is accessible to a cross-section of Indigenous Australians and has demonstrated properties of reliability and validity. An extended trial is needed to test the application of the instrument to a broader Indigenous audience and to further explore and confirm psychometric properties of the adapted instrument.Implications: This study introduces a culturally adapted tool for measuring rates of disordered gambling among Indigenous Australians.
Language eng
DOI 10.1111/1753-6405.12254
Field of Research 111799 Public Health and Health Services not elsewhere classified
1117 Public Health And Health Services
1402 Applied Economics
1605 Policy And Administration
Socio Economic Objective 920299 Health and Support Services not elsewhere classified
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2014, Wiley
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30078380

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Medicine
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