You are not logged in.

Monitoring the athlete training response: subjective self-reported measures trump commonly used objective measures: a systematic review

Saw, Anna E., Main, Luana C. and Gastin, Paul B. 2016, Monitoring the athlete training response: subjective self-reported measures trump commonly used objective measures: a systematic review, British journal of sports medicine, vol. 50, no. 5, pp. 1-13, doi: 10.1136/bjsports-2015-094758.

Attached Files
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads

Title Monitoring the athlete training response: subjective self-reported measures trump commonly used objective measures: a systematic review
Author(s) Saw, Anna E.
Main, Luana C.ORCID iD for Main, Luana C. orcid.org/0000-0002-9576-9466
Gastin, Paul B.ORCID iD for Gastin, Paul B. orcid.org/0000-0003-2320-7875
Journal name British journal of sports medicine
Volume number 50
Issue number 5
Start page 1
End page 13
Total pages 13
Publisher BMJ Publishing Group
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2016-03
ISSN 0306-3674
1473-0480
Summary Background Monitoring athlete well-being is essential to guide training and to detect any progression towards negative health outcomes and associated poor performance. Objective (performance, physiological, biochemical) and subjective measures are all options for athlete monitoring. Objective We systematically reviewed objective and subjective measures of athlete well-being. Objective measures, including those taken at rest (eg, blood markers, heart rate) and during exercise (eg, oxygen consumption, heart rate response), were compared against subjective measures (eg, mood, perceived stress). All measures were also evaluated for their response to acute and chronic training load. Methods The databases Academic search complete, MEDLINE, PsycINFO, SPORTDiscus and PubMed were searched in May 2014. Fifty-six original studies reported concurrent subjective and objective measures of athlete well-being. The quality and strength of findings of each study were evaluated to determine overall levels of evidence. Results Subjective and objective measures of athlete well-being generally did not correlate. Subjective measures reflected acute and chronic training loads with superior sensitivity and consistency than objective measures. Subjective well-being was typically impaired with an acute increase in training load, and also with chronic training, while an acute decrease in training load improved subjective well-being. Summary This review provides further support for practitioners to use subjective measures to monitor changes in athlete well-being in response to training. Subjective measures may stand alone, or be incorporated into a mixed methods approach to athlete monitoring, as is current practice in many sport settings.
Language eng
DOI 10.1136/bjsports-2015-094758
Field of Research 110699 Human Movement and Sports Science not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 920499 Public Health (excl. Specific Population Health) not elsewhere classified
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2016, BMJ Publishing Group
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30078405

Connect to link resolver
 
Unless expressly stated otherwise, the copyright for items in DRO is owned by the author, with all rights reserved.

Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 26 times in TR Web of Science
Scopus Citation Count Cited 36 times in Scopus
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Access Statistics: 225 Abstract Views, 1 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Wed, 23 Sep 2015, 15:16:05 EST

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.