Associations between fruit and vegetable consumption and depressive symptoms: evidence from a national Canadian longitudinal survey

Kingsbury, Mila, Dupuis, Gabrielle, Jacka, Felice, Roy-Gagnon, Marie-Helene, McMartin, Seanna E. and Colman, Ian 2016, Associations between fruit and vegetable consumption and depressive symptoms: evidence from a national Canadian longitudinal survey, Journal of epidemiology and community health, vol. 70, no. 2, pp. 155-161, doi: 10.1136/jech-2015-205858.

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Title Associations between fruit and vegetable consumption and depressive symptoms: evidence from a national Canadian longitudinal survey
Author(s) Kingsbury, Mila
Dupuis, Gabrielle
Jacka, FeliceORCID iD for Jacka, Felice orcid.org/0000-0002-9825-0328
Roy-Gagnon, Marie-Helene
McMartin, Seanna E.
Colman, Ian
Journal name Journal of epidemiology and community health
Volume number 70
Issue number 2
Start page 155
End page 161
Total pages 7
Publisher BMJ Publishing Group
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2016
ISSN 1470-2738
Keyword(s) DEPRESSION
DIET
MENTAL HEALTH
Summary BACKGROUND: Several cross-sectional studies have demonstrated associations between diet quality, including fruit and vegetable consumption, and mental health. However, research examining these associations longitudinally, while accounting for related lifestyle factors (eg, smoking, physical activity) is scarce. METHODS: This study used data from the National Population Health Survey (NPHS), a large, national longitudinal survey of Canadians. The sample included 8353 participants aged 18 and older. Every 2 years from 2002/2003 to 2010/2011, participants completed self-reports of daily fruit and vegetable consumption, physical activity, smoking and symptoms of depression and psychological distress. Using generalised estimating equations, we modelled the associations between fruit and vegetable consumption at each timepoint and depression at the next timepoint, adjusting for relevant covariates. RESULTS: Fruit and vegetable consumption at each cycle was inversely associated with next-cycle depression (β=-0.03, 95% CI -0.05 to -0.01, p<0.01) and psychological distress (β=-0.03, 95% CI -0.05 to -0.02, p<0.0001). However, once models were adjusted for other health-related factors, these associations were attenuated (β=-0.01, 95% CI -0.04 to 0.02, p=0.55; β=-0.00, 95% CI -0.03 to 0.02, p=0.78 for models predicting depression and distress, respectively). CONCLUSIONS: These findings suggest that relations between fruit and vegetable intake, other health-related behaviours and depression are complex. Behaviours such as smoking and physical activity may have a more important impact on depression than fruit and vegetable intake. Randomised control trials of diet are necessary to disentangle the effects of multiple health behaviours on mental health.
Language eng
DOI 10.1136/jech-2015-205858
Field of Research 111199 Nutrition and Dietetics not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 920411 Nutrition
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2016, BMJ Publishing Group
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30078430

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Faculty of Health
School of Medicine
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