Diet and bipolar disorder: a review of its relationship and potential therapeutic mechanisms of action

Lopresti, Adrian L. and Jacka, Felice N. 2015, Diet and bipolar disorder: a review of its relationship and potential therapeutic mechanisms of action, Journal of alternative and complementary medicine, vol. 21, no. 12, pp. 733-739, doi: 10.1089/acm.2015.0125.

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Title Diet and bipolar disorder: a review of its relationship and potential therapeutic mechanisms of action
Author(s) Lopresti, Adrian L.
Jacka, Felice N.ORCID iD for Jacka, Felice N. orcid.org/0000-0002-9825-0328
Journal name Journal of alternative and complementary medicine
Volume number 21
Issue number 12
Start page 733
End page 739
Total pages 7
Publisher Mary Ann Liebert
Place of publication Larchmont, N.Y.
Publication date 2015-12
ISSN 1557-7708
Summary OBJECTIVES: It is well accepted that diet quality has an important role in the prevention and treatment of several physical diseases. However, its influence on mental health has received far less attention, although there is increasing evidence to support a relationship with depression. In this narrative review, investigations into the relationship between diet and bipolar disorder are examined and the potential implications in the management and treatment of bipolar disorder are reviewed. METHODS: The authors provide a narrative review of the relevant information. RESULTS: Research is limited, although there are preliminary findings to suggest a relationship between diet and bipolar disorder. Findings from cross-sectional research suggest that people with bipolar disorder consume an unhealthier dietary pattern. This has significant treatment implications as bipolar disorder has a high comorbidity with several physical diseases. In addition, diet also influences several biological processes that are dysregulated in bipolar disorder, namely monoaminergic activity, immune/inflammatory processes, oxidative stress, mitochondrial activity, and neuroprogression. CONCLUSIONS: The role of diet in bipolar disorder requires further attention in research as it presents as a factor that may contribute to the worsening course of this condition and may potentially enhance current treatment outcomes.
Language eng
DOI 10.1089/acm.2015.0125
Field of Research 111199 Nutrition and Dietetics not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 920410 Mental Health
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2015, Mary Ann Liebert
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30078431

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Medicine
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