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Synchrotron powder diffraction study of cements pastes

Garcez, E. O., Aldridge, L. P., Raven, M., Gates, W. P., Collins, F., Franco, M. and Yokaichiya, F. 2015, Synchrotron powder diffraction study of cements pastes, Journal of the Australian ceramic society, vol. 51, no. 2, pp. 47-53.

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Title Synchrotron powder diffraction study of cements pastes
Author(s) Garcez, E. O.ORCID iD for Garcez, E. O. orcid.org/0000-0002-9586-472X
Aldridge, L. P.
Raven, M.
Gates, W. P.
Collins, F.ORCID iD for Collins, F. orcid.org/0000-0001-6331-5390
Franco, M.
Yokaichiya, F.
Journal name Journal of the Australian ceramic society
Volume number 51
Issue number 2
Start page 47
End page 53
Total pages 7
Publisher Australian Ceramic Society
Place of publication Sydney, N. S. W.
Publication date 2015
ISSN 0004-881X
Keyword(s) Innovation
Research
Cement and Concrete
Infrastructure
Durability
Summary  Knowledge of the degree of hydration of cement pastes is critical for determining properties such as the durability of concrete. As part of an integrated study on the prediction of chloride ingress in reinforced concrete, synchrotron Xray powder diffraction was used to estimate the degree of hydration of cement pastes. While for the past 20 years the composition of Portland cement has been determined by Rietveld analysis of X-ray diffraction, nevertheless there are a number of factors, including the amorphous content of the cement and relative proportion of mineral polymorphs present in the initial clinker, whose impact on the analysis are still not completely understood. Analysis of the resulting diffraction patterns indicated enhanced identification of polymorphs of alite, belite, ferrite and aluminate, which are present in the initial unhydrated cement and clinker, as well as improved quantification of hydrated crystalline phases such as calcium hydroxide and ettringite, which are key phases determining the speed of the chemical reactions in cement. In this paper we describe the experience that we have gained in the determination of the degree of hydration of cement pastes. We detail the standards and precautions that we took to characterize production cements and their hydration products.
Language eng
Field of Research 090503 Construction Materials
Socio Economic Objective 870301 Cement and Concrete Materials
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Grant ID ARC DP120102203
Copyright notice ©2015, Australian Ceramic Society
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30078495

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Institute for Frontier Materials
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.