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Predicting physiological capacity of human load carriage - a review

Drain, Jace, Billing, Daniel, Neesham-Smith, Daniel and Aisbett, Brad 2016, Predicting physiological capacity of human load carriage - a review, Applied ergonomics, vol. 52, pp. 85-94, doi: 10.1016/j.apergo.2015.07.003.

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Title Predicting physiological capacity of human load carriage - a review
Author(s) Drain, Jace
Billing, Daniel
Neesham-Smith, Daniel
Aisbett, BradORCID iD for Aisbett, Brad orcid.org/0000-0001-8077-0272
Journal name Applied ergonomics
Volume number 52
Start page 85
End page 94
Total pages 10
Publisher Elsevier
Place of publication Amsterdam, The Netherlands
Publication date 2016-01
ISSN 1872-9126
Keyword(s) Load carriage
Physiological work capacity
Relative task intensity
Science & Technology
Social Sciences
Technology
Engineering, Industrial
Ergonomics
Psychology, Applied
Engineering
Psychology
MAXIMAL OXYGEN-UPTAKE
CONTAINED BREATHING APPARATUS
PROLONGED TREADMILL WALKING
PHYSICAL PERFORMANCE TESTS
GAS-ANALYSIS SYSTEM
ENERGY-EXPENDITURE
CRITICAL POWER
WILDFIRE SUPPRESSION
SIMULATED RESCUE
AEROBIC CAPACITY
Summary This review article aims to evaluate a proposed maximum acceptable work duration model for load carriage tasks. It is contended that this concept has particular relevance to physically demanding occupations such as military and firefighting. Personnel in these occupations are often required to perform very physically demanding tasks, over varying time periods, often involving load carriage. Previous research has investigated concepts related to physiological workload limits in occupational settings (e.g. industrial). Evidence suggests however, that existing (unloaded) workload guidelines are not appropriate for load carriage tasks. The utility of this model warrants further work to enable prediction of load carriage durations across a range of functional workloads for physically demanding occupations. If the maximum duration for which personnel can physiologically sustain a load carriage task could be accurately predicted, commanders and supervisors could better plan for and manage tasks to ensure operational imperatives were met whilst minimising health risks for their workers.
Language eng
DOI 10.1016/j.apergo.2015.07.003
Field of Research 110699 Human Movement and Sports Science not elsewhere classified
1116 Medical Physiology
1203 Design Practice And Management
1106 Human Movement And Sports Science
Socio Economic Objective 929999 Health not elsewhere classified
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2016, Elsevier
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30078507

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