Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus antibody reactors among camels in Dubai, United Arab Emirates, in 2005

Alexandersen, S., Kobinger, G. P., Soule, G. and Wernery, U. 2014, Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus antibody reactors among camels in Dubai, United Arab Emirates, in 2005, Transboundary and emerging diseases, vol. 61, no. 2, pp. 105-108, doi: 10.1111/tbed.12212.

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Title Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus antibody reactors among camels in Dubai, United Arab Emirates, in 2005
Author(s) Alexandersen, S.ORCID iD for Alexandersen, S. orcid.org/0000-0002-5039-3178
Kobinger, G. P.
Soule, G.
Wernery, U.
Journal name Transboundary and emerging diseases
Volume number 61
Issue number 2
Start page 105
End page 108
Total pages 4
Publisher Wiley
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2014-04
ISSN 1865-1674
1865-1682
Keyword(s) Antibodies
Dromedaries
Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus
Summary We tested, using a low starting dilution, sequential serum samples from dromedary camels, sheep and horses collected in Dubai from February/April to October of 2005 and from dromedary camels for export/import testing between Canada and USA in 2000-2001. Using a standard Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) neutralization test, serial sera from three sheep and three horses were all negative while sera from 9 of 11 dromedary camels from Dubai were positive for antibodies supported by similar results in a MERS-CoV recombinant partial spike protein antibody ELISA. The two negative Dubai camels were both dromedary calves and remained negative over the 5 months studied. The six dromedary samples from USA and Canada were negative in both tests. These results support the recent findings that infection with MERS-CoV or a closely related virus is not a new occurrence in camels in the Middle East. Therefore, interactions of MERS-CoV at the human-animal interface may have been ongoing for several, perhaps many, years and by inference, a widespread pandemic may be less likely unless significant evolution of the virus allow accelerated infection and spread potential in the human population.
Language eng
DOI 10.1111/tbed.12212
Field of Research 070712 Veterinary Virology
Socio Economic Objective 920120 Zoonoses
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2014, Wiley
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30078680

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Medicine
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