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Investigation into the role of potentially contaminated feed as a source of the first-detected outbreaks of porcine epidemic diarrhea in Canada

Pasick, J., Berhane, Y., Ojkic, D., Maxie, G., Embury-Hyatt, C., Swekla, K., Handel, K., Fairles, J. and Alexandersen, S. 2014, Investigation into the role of potentially contaminated feed as a source of the first-detected outbreaks of porcine epidemic diarrhea in Canada, Transboundary and emerging diseases, vol. 61, no. 5, pp. 397-410, doi: 10.1111/tbed.12269.

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Title Investigation into the role of potentially contaminated feed as a source of the first-detected outbreaks of porcine epidemic diarrhea in Canada
Author(s) Pasick, J.
Berhane, Y.
Ojkic, D.
Maxie, G.
Embury-Hyatt, C.
Swekla, K.
Handel, K.
Fairles, J.
Alexandersen, S.ORCID iD for Alexandersen, S. orcid.org/0000-0002-5039-3178
Journal name Transboundary and emerging diseases
Volume number 61
Issue number 5
Start page 397
End page 410
Total pages 14
Publisher Wiley
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2014-10
ISSN 1865-1674
1865-1682
Keyword(s) Porcine epidemic diarrhea
Spray-dried porcine plasma
Transmission
Summary In January 2014, approximately 9 months following the initial detection of porcine epidemic diarrhea (PED) in the USA, the first case of PED was confirmed in a swine herd in south-western Ontario. A follow-up epidemiological investigation carried out on the initial and 10 subsequent Ontario PED cases pointed to feed as a common risk factor. As a result, several lots of feed and spray-dried porcine plasma (SDPP) used as a feed supplement were tested for the presence of PEDV genome by real-time RT-PCR assay. Several of these tested positive, supporting the notion that contaminated feed may have been responsible for the introduction of PEDV into Canada. These findings led us to conduct a bioassay experiment in which three PEDV-positive SDPP samples (from a single lot) and two PEDV-positive feed samples supplemented with this SDPP were used to orally inoculate 3-week-old piglets. Although the feed-inoculated piglets did not show any significant excretion of PEDV, the SDPP-inoculated piglets shed PEDV at a relatively high level for ≥9 days. Despite the fact that the tested PEDV genome positive feed did not result in obvious piglet infection in our bioassay experiment, contaminated feed cannot be ruled out as a likely source of this introduction in the field where many other variables may play a contributing role.
Language eng
DOI 10.1111/tbed.12269
Field of Research 070712 Veterinary Virology
Socio Economic Objective 920109 Infectious Diseases
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2014, Wiley
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30078681

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Faculty of Health
School of Medicine
Open Access Collection
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.