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The role of African buffalos (syncerus caffer) in the maintenance of foot-and-mouth disease in Uganda

Ayebazibwe, Chrisistom, Mwiine, Frank N., Tjørnehøj, Kirsten, Balinda, Sheila N., Muwanika, Vincent B., Ademun Okurut, Anna R., Belsham, Graham J., Normann, Preben, Siegismund, Hans R. and Alexandersen, Soren 2010, The role of African buffalos (syncerus caffer) in the maintenance of foot-and-mouth disease in Uganda, BMC veterinary research, vol. 6, pp. 1-13, doi: 10.1186/1746-6148-6-54.

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Title The role of African buffalos (syncerus caffer) in the maintenance of foot-and-mouth disease in Uganda
Formatted title The role of African buffalos (syncerus caffer) in the maintenance of foot-and-mouth disease in Uganda
Author(s) Ayebazibwe, Chrisistom
Mwiine, Frank N.
Tjørnehøj, Kirsten
Balinda, Sheila N.
Muwanika, Vincent B.
Ademun Okurut, Anna R.
Belsham, Graham J.
Normann, Preben
Siegismund, Hans R.
Alexandersen, SorenORCID iD for Alexandersen, Soren orcid.org/0000-0002-5039-3178
Journal name BMC veterinary research
Volume number 6
Article ID 54
Start page 1
End page 13
Total pages 13
Publisher BioMed Central
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2010-12-11
ISSN 1746-6148
Keyword(s) Amino Acid Sequence
Animals
Antelopes
Antibodies, Viral
Buffaloes
Disease Reservoirs
Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay
Foot-and-Mouth Disease
Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus
Molecular Sequence Data
Phylogeny
Serotyping
Uganda
Summary BACKGROUND: To study the role of African buffalos (Syncerus caffer) in the maintenance of foot-and-mouth disease in Uganda, serum samples were collected from 207 African buffalos, 21 impalas (Aepyceros melampus), 1 giraffe (Giraffa camelopardalis), 1 common eland (Taurotragus oryx), 7 hartebeests (Alcelaphus buselaphus) and 5 waterbucks (Kobus ellipsiprymnus) from four major National Parks in Uganda between 2005 and 2008. Serum samples were screened to detect antibodies against foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) non-structural proteins (NSP) using the Ceditest® FMDV NS ELISA. Solid Phase Blocking ELISAs (SPBE) were used to determine the serotype-specificity of antibodies against the seven serotypes of FMDV among the positive samples. Virus isolation and sequencing were undertaken to identify circulating viruses and determine relatedness between them.

RESULTS: Among the buffalo samples tested, 85% (95% CI = 80-90%) were positive for antibodies against FMDV non-structural proteins while one hartebeest sample out of seven (14.3%; 95% CI = -11.6-40.2%) was the only positive from 35 other wildlife samples from a variety of different species. In the buffalo, high serotype-specific antibody titres (≥ 80) were found against serotypes O (7/27 samples), SAT 1 (23/29 samples), SAT 2 (18/32 samples) and SAT 3 (16/30 samples). Among the samples titrated for antibodies against the four serotypes O, SAT 1, SAT 2 and SAT 3, 17/22 (77%; CI = 59.4-94.6%) had high titres against at least two serotypes.FMDV isolates of serotypes SAT 1 (1 sample) and SAT 2 (2 samples) were obtained from buffalo probang samples collected in Queen Elizabeth National Park (QENP) in 2007. Sequence analysis and comparison of VP1 coding sequences showed that the SAT 1 isolate belonged to topotype IV while the SAT 2 isolates belonged to different lineages within the East African topotype X.

CONCLUSIONS: Consistent detection of high antibody titres in buffalos supports the view that African buffalos play an important role in the maintenance of FMDV infection within National Parks in Uganda. Both SAT 1 and SAT 2 viruses were isolated, and serological data indicate that it is also likely that FMDV serotypes O and SAT 3 may be present in the buffalo population. Detailed studies should be undertaken to define further the role of wildlife in the epidemiology of FMDV in East Africa.
Language eng
DOI 10.1186/1746-6148-6-54
Field of Research 070712 Veterinary Virology
0707 Veterinary Sciences
0605 Microbiology
0601 Biochemistry And Cell Biology
Socio Economic Objective 920109 Infectious Diseases
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2010, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30078686

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Medicine
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.