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Young people's perceptions of the risks of methamphetamine use in Adelaide nightclubs: a quantitative study

Groves, Andrew 2015, Young people's perceptions of the risks of methamphetamine use in Adelaide nightclubs: a quantitative study, Flinders law journal, vol. 17, no. 1, pp. 95-126.

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Title Young people's perceptions of the risks of methamphetamine use in Adelaide nightclubs: a quantitative study
Author(s) Groves, Andrew
Journal name Flinders law journal
Volume number 17
Issue number 1
Start page 95
End page 126
Total pages 31
Publisher Flinders Law School, Flinders University
Place of publication Adelaide, S. A.
Publication date 2015
Keyword(s) Methamphetamines
young people
perceptions of risk
nightclub
quantitative analysis
Summary Understanding young people’s perceptions of the risks associated with the use of methamphetamines is an important but under-researched area. Precisely how these young people use the space of Adelaide nightclubs, perceive such drug risks, employ risk management strategies and how these factors interact to influence their experience of methamphetamines in the nightclub is largely unknown. This article presents self-report data drawn from a sample of 457 young people who completed the Perception of Risk survey questionnaire while waiting to enter one of five key Adelaide nightclubs in 2010. Participants were examined in terms of gender, age, drug use history, motivations for nightclub attendance and frequency of nightclub attendance. Approximately one-fifth of the sample reported using methamphetamines (21.0 percent).Participants demonstrated a pattern of attendance at Adelaide nightclubs that reflects a broader understanding of the important role of the nightclub in their social lives, which for some also involves the use of methamphetamines. Specifically, participants’ motivations for ‘nightclubbing’ concern the consumption of leisure and are guided by social group membership, in which methamphetamine use is not prioritised, as evident in the development of knowledge and risk management strategies to ensure safe consumption in the club. Perceptions of risk reflect concern surrounding unregulated methamphetamine use, as well as gendered concerns linked to safety and the prevalence of alcohol misuse, violence, drink spiking, physical injury and sexual assault. These findings were consistent across the sample, suggesting a shift in youth nightclub culture that has numerous implications for understanding and reducing the use of methamphetamines and regulation of the night-time economy generally, which are discussed herein.
Language eng
Field of Research 160299 Criminology not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 940403 Criminal Justice
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2015, Flinders Law School, Flinders University
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30078764

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Humanities and Social Sciences
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.