You are not logged in.
Openly accessible

Occupational class differences in suicide: evidence of changes over time and during the global financial crisis in Australia

Milner, Alison J., Niven, Heather and LaMontagne, Anthony D. 2015, Occupational class differences in suicide: evidence of changes over time and during the global financial crisis in Australia, BMC psychiatry, vol. 15, Article Number : 223, pp. 1-7.

Attached Files
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads
milner-occupationalclassdifferences-2015.pdf Published version application/pdf 1.23MB 41

Title Occupational class differences in suicide: evidence of changes over time and during the global financial crisis in Australia
Author(s) Milner, Alison J.
Niven, Heather
LaMontagne, Anthony D.ORCID iD for LaMontagne, Anthony D. orcid.org/0000-0002-5811-5906
Journal name BMC psychiatry
Volume number 15
Season Article Number : 223
Start page 1
End page 7
Total pages 7
Publisher BioMed Central
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2015
ISSN 1471-244X
Keyword(s) Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Psychiatry
Occupation
Suicide
Recession
Gender
Socio-economic gradient
Skill level
Intentional self-harm
ECONOMIC RECESSION
INEQUALITIES
MORTALITY
ENGLAND
HEALTH
COUNTRIES
INCREASE
RISK
Summary BACKGROUND: Previous research showed an increase in Australian suicide rates during the Global Financial Crisis (GFC). There has been no research investigating whether suicide rates by occupational class changed during the GFC. The aim of this study was to investigate whether the GFC-associated increase in suicide rates in employed Australians may have masked changes by occupational class.

METHODS: Negative binomial regression models were used to investigate Rate Ratios (RRs) in suicide by occupational class. Years of the GFC (2007, 2008, 2009) were compared to the baseline years 2001-2006.

RESULTS: There were widening disparities between a number of the lower class occupations and the highest class occupations during the years 2007, 2008, and 2009 for males, but less evidence of differences for females.

CONCLUSIONS: Occupational disparities in suicide rates widened over the GFC period. There is a need for programs to be responsive to economic downturns, and to prioritise the occupational groups most affected.
Language eng
Field of Research 111705 Environmental and Occupational Health and Safety
1103 Clinical Sciences
Socio Economic Objective 920505 Occupational Health
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2015, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30078788

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Health and Social Development
Open Access Collection
Connect to link resolver
 
Unless expressly stated otherwise, the copyright for items in DRO is owned by the author, with all rights reserved.

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.

Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 7 times in TR Web of Science
Scopus Citation Count Cited 7 times in Scopus
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Access Statistics: 143 Abstract Views, 42 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Tue, 01 Dec 2015, 11:17:43 EST

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.