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Impact of automated dispensing cabinets on medication selection and preparation error rates in an emergency department: a prospective and direct observational before-and-after study

Fanning, Laura, Jones, Nick and Manias, Elizabeth 2016, Impact of automated dispensing cabinets on medication selection and preparation error rates in an emergency department: a prospective and direct observational before-and-after study, Journal of evaluation in clinical practice, vol. 22, no. 2, pp. 156-163, doi: 10.1111/jep.12445.

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Title Impact of automated dispensing cabinets on medication selection and preparation error rates in an emergency department: a prospective and direct observational before-and-after study
Author(s) Fanning, Laura
Jones, Nick
Manias, ElizabethORCID iD for Manias, Elizabeth orcid.org/0000-0002-3747-0087
Journal name Journal of evaluation in clinical practice
Volume number 22
Issue number 2
Start page 156
End page 163
Total pages 8
Publisher Wiley
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2016-04
ISSN 1365-2753
Keyword(s) automation
emergency service
hospital
medication errors
medication systems
patient safety
Summary RATIONALE, AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: The implementation of automated dispensing cabinets (ADCs) in healthcare facilities appears to be increasing, in particular within Australian hospital emergency departments (EDs). While the investment in ADCs is on the increase, no studies have specifically investigated the impacts of ADCs on medication selection and preparation error rates in EDs. Our aim was to assess the impact of ADCs on medication selection and preparation error rates in an ED of a tertiary teaching hospital. METHODS: Pre intervention and post intervention study involving direct observations of nurses completing medication selection and preparation activities before and after the implementation of ADCs in the original and new emergency departments within a 377-bed tertiary teaching hospital in Australia. Medication selection and preparation error rates were calculated and compared between these two periods. Secondary end points included the impact on medication error type and severity. RESULTS: A total of 2087 medication selection and preparations were observed among 808 patients pre and post intervention. Implementation of ADCs in the new ED resulted in a 64.7% (1.96% versus 0.69%, respectively, P = 0.017) reduction in medication selection and preparation errors. All medication error types were reduced in the post intervention study period. There was an insignificant impact on medication error severity as all errors detected were categorised as minor. CONCLUSION: The implementation of ADCs could reduce medication selection and preparation errors and improve medication safety in an ED setting.
Language eng
DOI 10.1111/jep.12445
Field of Research 1117 Public Health And Health Services
111708 Health and Community Services
Socio Economic Objective 920210 Nursing
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2016, Wiley
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30078815

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Nursing and Midwifery
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