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Population genomics of the Wolbachia endosymbiont in Drosophila melanogaster

Richardson, Mark F, Weinert, Lucy A, Welch, John J, Linheiro, Raquel S, Magwire, Michael M, Jiggins, Francis M and Bergman, Casey M 2012, Population genomics of the Wolbachia endosymbiont in Drosophila melanogaster, PLoS genetics, vol. 8, no. 12, pp. 1-16, doi: 10.1371/journal.pgen.1003129.

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Title Population genomics of the Wolbachia endosymbiont in Drosophila melanogaster
Formatted title Population genomics of the Wolbachia endosymbiont in Drosophila melanogaster
Author(s) Richardson, Mark FORCID iD for Richardson, Mark F orcid.org/0000-0002-1650-0064
Weinert, Lucy A
Welch, John J
Linheiro, Raquel S
Magwire, Michael M
Jiggins, Francis M
Bergman, Casey M
Journal name PLoS genetics
Volume number 8
Issue number 12
Article ID e1003129
Start page 1
End page 16
Total pages 16
Publisher Public Library of Science
Place of publication San Francisco, Calif.
Publication date 2012-12
ISSN 1553-7390
1553-7404
Keyword(s) Animals
Bayes Theorem
Drosophila melanogaster
Evolution, Molecular
Genetic Variation
Genome, Mitochondrial
Haplotypes
Metagenomics
Phylogeny
Symbiosis
Wolbachia
Summary Wolbachia are maternally inherited symbiotic bacteria, commonly found in arthropods, which are able to manipulate the reproduction of their host in order to maximise their transmission. The evolutionary history of endosymbionts like Wolbachia can be revealed by integrating information on infection status in natural populations with patterns of sequence variation in Wolbachia and host mitochondrial genomes. Here we use whole-genome resequencing data from 290 lines of Drosophila melanogaster from North America, Europe, and Africa to predict Wolbachia infection status, estimate relative cytoplasmic genome copy number, and reconstruct Wolbachia and mitochondrial genome sequences. Overall, 63% of Drosophila strains were predicted to be infected with Wolbachia by our in silico analysis pipeline, which shows 99% concordance with infection status determined by diagnostic PCR. Complete Wolbachia and mitochondrial genomes show congruent phylogenies, consistent with strict vertical transmission through the maternal cytoplasm and imperfect transmission of Wolbachia. Bayesian phylogenetic analysis reveals that the most recent common ancestor of all Wolbachia and mitochondrial genomes in D. melanogaster dates to around 8,000 years ago. We find evidence for a recent global replacement of ancestral Wolbachia and mtDNA lineages, but our data suggest that the derived wMel lineage arose several thousand years ago, not in the 20th century as previously proposed. Our data also provide evidence that this global replacement event is incomplete and is likely to be one of several similar incomplete replacement events that have occurred since the out-of-Africa migration that allowed D. melanogaster to colonize worldwide habitats. This study provides a complete genomic analysis of the evolutionary mode and temporal dynamics of the D. melanogaster–Wolbachia symbiosis, as well as important resources for further analyses of the impact of Wolbachia on host biology.
Language eng
DOI 10.1371/journal.pgen.1003129
Field of Research 060408 Genomics
0604 Genetics
Socio Economic Objective 0 Not Applicable
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2012, Richardson et al
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30078852

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.