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Anodal transcranial direct current stimulation prolongs the cross-education of strength and corticomotor plasticity

Hendy, Ashlee M., Teo, Wei-Peng and Kidgell, Dawson J. 2015, Anodal transcranial direct current stimulation prolongs the cross-education of strength and corticomotor plasticity, Medicine and science in sports and exercise, vol. 47, no. 9, pp. 1788-1797, doi: 10.1249/MSS.0000000000000600.

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Title Anodal transcranial direct current stimulation prolongs the cross-education of strength and corticomotor plasticity
Author(s) Hendy, Ashlee M.
Teo, Wei-Peng
Kidgell, Dawson J.
Journal name Medicine and science in sports and exercise
Volume number 47
Issue number 9
Start page 1788
End page 1797
Total pages 10
Publisher Lippincott Williams & Wilkins
Place of publication Philadelphia, Pa.
Publication date 2015-09
ISSN 0195-9131
1530-0315
Keyword(s) biceps brachii
cross-transfer
excitability
motor cortex
inhibition
transcranial magnetic stimulation
Summary Purpose This study aimed to assess the efficacy of applying anodal transcranial direct-current stimulation (a-tDCS) to the ipsilateral motor cortex (iM1) during unilateral strength training to enhance the neurophysiological and functional effects of cross-education. Methods Twenty-four healthy volunteers were randomly allocated to perform either of the following: strength training during a-tDCS (ST + a-tDCS), strength training during sham tDCS (ST + sham), or a-tDCS during rest (a-tDCS) across 2 wk. Strength training of the right biceps brachii involved four sets of six repetitions at 80% of one-repetition maximum three times per week. Anodal tDCS was applied to the iM1 at 1.5 mA for 15 min during each strength training session. Outcome measures included one-repetition maximum strength of the untrained biceps brachii, corticomotoneuronal excitability, cross-activation, and short-interval intracortical inhibition (SICI) of the iM1 determined by transcranial magnetic stimulation. Results Immediately after the final training session, there was an increase in strength for both the ST + a-tDCS (12.5%, P < 0.001) and the ST + sham group (9.4%, P = 0.007), which was accompanied by significant increases in corticomotoneuronal excitability and decreases in SICI for both groups. After a 48-h retention period, strength increase was maintained in the ST + a-tDCS (13.0%, P = 0.001) group, which was significantly greater than the ST + sham group (7.6%, P = 0.039). Similarly, increases in corticomotoneuronal excitability and decreases in SICI were maintained in the ST + a-tDCS group but not in the ST + sham group. No main effects were reported for the a-tDCS group (all P > 0.05). Conclusions The addition of a-tDCS to the iM1 during unilateral strength training prolongs the benefits of cross-education, which may have significant implications to enhancement of rehabilitation outcomes after a single-limb injury or impairment.
Language eng
DOI 10.1249/MSS.0000000000000600
Field of Research 110699 Human Movement and Sports Science not elsewhere classified
1106 Human Movement And Sports Science
Socio Economic Objective 970111 Expanding Knowledge in the Medical and Health Sciences
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2015, American College of Sports Medicine
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30078879

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences
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