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The unstable print: Material challenges in printmaking and the moving image

Weiss, Gali 2015, The unstable print: Material challenges in printmaking and the moving image, in IMPACT 9 2015 : Printmaking in the Post-Print Age: Critical and Creative Methods in the context of Contemporary Art and Society : Proceedings of the IMPACT 2015 Conference, China Academy of Art Press, Hangzhou, China, pp. 185-190.

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Title The unstable print: Material challenges in printmaking and the moving image
Author(s) Weiss, Gali
Conference name IMPACT 9 International Printmaking. Conference (2015 : Hangzhou, China)
Conference location Hangzhou, China
Conference dates 22-26 Sept. 2015
Title of proceedings IMPACT 9 2015 : Printmaking in the Post-Print Age: Critical and Creative Methods in the context of Contemporary Art and Society : Proceedings of the IMPACT 2015 Conference
Editor(s) [unknown]
Publication date 2015
Start page 185
End page 190
Total pages 6
Publisher China Academy of Art Press
Place of publication Hangzhou, China
Keyword(s) Print as performative media
Summary The past few years have seen an emergence of printmakers motivated by moving-image technology to use print as performative creative practice; in film and animation, as installation and in various processes of thinking and production. Notions of movement and change that could be said to identify much of our contemporary world reflect the interests of a number of printmakers who utilize printmaking characteristics of multiplicity and reproduction by integrating the digital and the handmade within the moving-image. There seems to be a restlessness by some artists who wish to explore an unbounded, experimental approach to printmaking; perhaps it is a natural progression for printmakers to relate their processes of thinking and production to concepts of frame-by-frame production – to additive and subtractive methods, multiple imagery and the reproduced or copy. But what happens when printmaking that has entered the realm of multimedia technology returns to the physical, material print? This paper presents and discusses printmaking as moving image, and in particular the practice of printmaking that utilizes the copy and multiplicity while exploiting qualities of change through, for example, organic non-archival materials. Drawing from my own print projects and practice as well as the work of other Australian printmakers, the paper asks: can the physical print convincingly perform, not only represent, movement and change as analog experience through its materiality, and how is it to be valued within printmaking conventions concerned with longevity and permanence?
Language eng
Field of Research 190502 Fine Arts (incl Sculpture and Painting)
Socio Economic Objective 970119 Expanding Knowledge through Studies of the Creative Arts and Writing
HERDC Research category EN Other conference paper
Copyright notice ©2015, CFPR
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30078947

Document type: Conference Paper
Collections: School of Communication and Creative Arts
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.