You are not logged in.
Openly accessible

Contribution of the after-school period to children’s daily participation in physical activity and sedentary behaviours

Arundell, Lauren, Hinkley, Trina, Veitch, Jenny and Salmon, Jo 2015, Contribution of the after-school period to children’s daily participation in physical activity and sedentary behaviours, PLoS One, vol. 10, no. 10, Article Number : e0140132, pp. 1-11, doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0140132.

Attached Files
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads
arundell-contributionof-2015.pdf Published version application/pdf 307.43KB 32

Title Contribution of the after-school period to children’s daily participation in physical activity and sedentary behaviours
Author(s) Arundell, LaurenORCID iD for Arundell, Lauren orcid.org/0000-0002-8178-4104
Hinkley, TrinaORCID iD for Hinkley, Trina orcid.org/0000-0003-2742-8579
Veitch, JennyORCID iD for Veitch, Jenny orcid.org/0000-0001-8962-0887
Salmon, JoORCID iD for Salmon, Jo orcid.org/0000-0002-4734-6354
Journal name PLoS One
Volume number 10
Issue number 10
Season Article Number : e0140132
Start page 1
End page 11
Total pages 11
Publisher Public Library of Science (PLoS)
Place of publication San Francisco, Calif.
Publication date 2015
ISSN 1932-6203
Keyword(s) after-school
physical activity
sedentary behaviour
contribution
children
Science & Technology
Multidisciplinary Sciences
Science & Technology - Other Topics
AGED CHILDREN
WEIGHT STATUS
YOUTH
ASSOCIATIONS
ADOLESCENTS
GUIDELINES
VALIDITY
PATTERNS
MODERATE
GENDER
Summary Objectives: Children’s after-school physical activity (PA) and sedentary behaviours (SB) are not well understood, despite the potential this period holds for intervention. This study aimed to describe children’s after-school physical activity and sedentary behaviours; establish the contribution this makes to daily participation and to achieving physical activity and sedentary behaviours guidelines; and to determine the association between after-school moderate- to vigorous-intensity physical activity (MVPA), screen-based sedentary behaviours and achieving the physical activity and sedentary behaviour guidelines.Methods: Children (n=406, mean age 8.1 years, 58% girls) wore an ActiGraph GT3X accelerometer. The percentage of time and minutes spent sedentary (SED), in light- physical activity (LPA) and MVPA between the end-of-school and 6pm (weekdays) was calculated. Parents (n=318, 40 years, 89% female) proxy-reported their child’s after-school participation in screen-based sedentary behaviours. The contribution that after-school SED, LPA, MVPA, and screen-based sedentary behaviours made to daily levels, and that after-school MVPA and screen-based sedentary behaviours made to achieving the physical activity/sedentary behaviour guidelines was calculated. Regression analysis determined the association between after-school MVPA and screen-based sedentary behaviours and achieving the physical activity/sedentary behaviours guidelines.Results: Children spent 54% of the after-school period SED and this accounted for 21% of children’s daily SED levels. Boys spent a greater percentage of time in MVPA than girls (14.9% vs. 13.6%; p<0.05) but this made a smaller contribution to their daily levels (27.6% vs 29.8%; p<0.05). After school, boys and girls respectively performed 18.8 minutes and 16.7 minutes of MVPA which is 31.4% and 27.8% of the MVPA (p<0.05) required to achieve the physical activity guidelines. Children spent 96 minutes in screen-based sedentary behaviours, contributing to 84% of their daily screen-based sedentary behaviours and 80% of the sedentary behaviour guidelines. After-school MVPA was positively associated with achieving the physical activity guidelines (OR: 1.31, 95%CI 1.18, 1.44, p<0.05) and after-school screen-based sedentary behaviours was negatively associated with achieving the sedentary behaviours guidelines (OR: 0.97, 95%CI: 0.96, 0.97, p<0.05).Conclusions: The after-school period plays a critical role in the accumulation of children’s physical activity and sedentary behaviours. Small changes to after school behaviours can have large impacts on children’s daily behaviours levels and likelihood of meeting the recommended levels of physical activity and sedentary behaviour. Therefore interventions should target reducing after-school sedentary behaviours and increasing physical activity.
Language eng
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0140132
Field of Research 110699 Human Movement and Sports Science not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 920401 Behaviour and Health
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Grant ID NHMRC Project Grant 533815
Copyright notice ©2015, Public Library of Science (PLoS)
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30078993

Connect to link resolver
 
Unless expressly stated otherwise, the copyright for items in DRO is owned by the author, with all rights reserved.

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.

Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 1 times in TR Web of Science
Scopus Citation Count Cited 2 times in Scopus
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Access Statistics: 155 Abstract Views, 33 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Thu, 07 Jan 2016, 09:57:10 EST

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.