A longitudinal analysis of self-prescribed complementary and alternative medicine use by a nationally representative sample of 19,783 Australian women, 2006-2010

Bowe, Steven, Adams, Jon, Lui, Chi-Wai and Sibbritt, David 2015, A longitudinal analysis of self-prescribed complementary and alternative medicine use by a nationally representative sample of 19,783 Australian women, 2006-2010, Complementary therapies in medicine, vol. 23, no. 5, pp. 699-704, doi: 10.1016/j.ctim.2015.06.011.

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Title A longitudinal analysis of self-prescribed complementary and alternative medicine use by a nationally representative sample of 19,783 Australian women, 2006-2010
Author(s) Bowe, StevenORCID iD for Bowe, Steven orcid.org/0000-0003-3813-842X
Adams, Jon
Lui, Chi-Wai
Sibbritt, David
Journal name Complementary therapies in medicine
Volume number 23
Issue number 5
Start page 699
End page 704
Total pages 6
Publisher Elsevier
Place of publication Amsterdam, The Netherlands
Publication date 2015-10
ISSN 1873-6963
Keyword(s) Complementary and alternative medicine
Longitudinal analysis
Self-prescription
Women
Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Integrative & Complementary Medicine
HEALTH AUSTRALIA
CANCER
DEPRESSION
PREGNANCY
COHORT
URBAN
CAM
Summary BACKGROUND: Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) use is increasingly popular amongst general populations around the world with women constituting substantial CAM users. However, self-prescribed CAM use does raise potential safety concerns and so it is important to identify those risk factors associated with self-prescribed CAM use. METHODS: Data was obtained from the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health (ALSWH). Longitudinal data analyses were conducted on questionnaire data from the 1973-78 cohort (n=9,145) and the 1946-51 cohort (n=10,638), collected over the period 2006-2010. RESULTS: In the 1973-78 cohort, use of self-prescribed CAM was 73.2% in 2006 and 75.3% in 2009. For the 1946-51 cohort, use of self-prescribed CAM was 73.9% in 2007 and 74.7% in 2010. There were similar levels of use of individual self-prescribed CAM, with the exception that the use of herbal medicine was much higher among the 1946-51 cohort (20% vs. 27%). There was a substantial increase over three years in the use of vitamins/minerals in both cohorts (21% and 19%, respectively). In contrast, there was a considerable decline over three years in use of aromatherapy oils in both cohorts (34% and 28%, respectively). CONCLUSION: Self-prescribed CAM use is popular amongst women in Australia and it is important that conventional practitioners providing women's health care be cognizant of such use amongst their patients. In order to ensure effective practice, there is a need for further research to explore women's decision-making and experiences around self-prescribed CAM use.
Language eng
DOI 10.1016/j.ctim.2015.06.011
Field of Research 110499 Complementary and Alternative Medicine not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 929999 Health not elsewhere classified
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2015, Elsevier
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30079150

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: Faculty of Health
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