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The Children's Attention Project: a community-based longitudinal study of children with ADHD and non-ADHD controls

Sciberras, Emma, Efron, Daryl, Schilpzand, Elizabeth J., Anderson, Vicki, Jongeling, Brad, Hazell, Philip, Ukoumunne, Obioha C. and Nicholson, Jan M. 2013, The Children's Attention Project: a community-based longitudinal study of children with ADHD and non-ADHD controls, BMC psychiatry, vol. 13, no. 18, pp. 1-11, doi: 10.1186/1471-244X-13-18.

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Title The Children's Attention Project: a community-based longitudinal study of children with ADHD and non-ADHD controls
Author(s) Sciberras, EmmaORCID iD for Sciberras, Emma orcid.org/0000-0003-2812-303X
Efron, Daryl
Schilpzand, Elizabeth J.
Anderson, Vicki
Jongeling, Brad
Hazell, Philip
Ukoumunne, Obioha C.
Nicholson, Jan M.
Journal name BMC psychiatry
Volume number 13
Issue number 18
Start page 1
End page 11
Total pages 11
Publisher BioMed Central
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2013-01
ISSN 1471-244X
Keyword(s) Attention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity
Australia
Case-Control Studies
Child
Child Development
Educational Status
Executive Function
Humans
Interview, Psychological
Longitudinal Studies
Mass Screening
Psychology, Child
Quality of Life
Surveys and Questionnaires
Summary Background
Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) affects approximately 5% of children worldwide and results in significant impairments in daily functioning. Few community-ascertained samples of children with ADHD have been studied prospectively to identify factors associated with differential outcomes. The Children’s Attention Project is the first such study in Australia, examining the mental health, social, academic and quality of life outcomes for children with diagnostically-confirmed ADHD compared to non-ADHD controls. The study aims to map the course of ADHD symptoms over time and to identify risk and protective factors associated with differential outcomes.

Methods/design

The sample for this prospective longitudinal study is being recruited across 43 socio-economically diverse primary schools across Melbourne, Australia. All children in Grade 1, the second year of formal schooling (6–8 years), are screened for ADHD symptoms using independent parent and teacher reports on the Conners’ 3 ADHD index (~N = 5260). Children screening positive for ADHD by both parent and teacher report, and a matched sample (gender, school) screening negative, are invited to participate in the longitudinal study. At baseline this involves parent completion of the NIMH Diagnostic Interview Schedule for Children IV (DISC-IV) to confirm likely ADHD diagnostic status and identify other mental health difficulties, direct child assessments (cognitive, academic, language and executive functioning; height and weight) and questionnaires for parents and teachers assessing outcomes, as well as a broad range of risk and protective factors (child, parent/family, teacher/school, and socio-economic factors). Families will be initially followed up for 3 years.

Discussion

This study is the first Australian longitudinal study of children with ADHD and one of the first community-based longitudinal studies of diagnostically confirmed children with ADHD. The study’s examination of a broad range of risk and protective factors and ADHD-related outcomes has the potential to inform novel strategies for intervention and prevention.
Language eng
DOI 10.1186/1471-244X-13-18
Field of Research 111706 Epidemiology
111714 Mental Health
111403 Paediatrics
1103 Clinical Sciences
Socio Economic Objective 920410 Mental Health
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2013, Sciberras et al
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30079182

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Psychology
Open Access Collection
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.