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Individual differences in intention to fake job interviews: Personality, self-monitoring, and the theory of planned behaviour

Lester, Candice, Anglim, Jeromy and Fullarton, Christie 2015, Individual differences in intention to fake job interviews: Personality, self-monitoring, and the theory of planned behaviour, Australasian journal of organisational psychology, vol. 8, no. e8, pp. 1-11, doi: 10.1017/orp.2015.7.

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Title Individual differences in intention to fake job interviews: Personality, self-monitoring, and the theory of planned behaviour
Author(s) Lester, Candice
Anglim, JeromyORCID iD for Anglim, Jeromy orcid.org/0000-0002-1809-9315
Fullarton, Christie
Journal name Australasian journal of organisational psychology
Volume number 8
Issue number e8
Start page 1
End page 11
Total pages 11
Publisher Cambridge University Press
Place of publication Cambridge, Eng.
Publication date 2015
ISSN 2054-2232
Keyword(s) theory of planned behaviour
personality
faking
selection and recruitment
job interviews
Summary When job applicants lie in job interviews, they can deprive a more honest candidate of a job and deprive an organisation of the best employees. To better understand job interview faking, the present study examined the effect of general dispositions and domain-specific beliefs on the intention to fake job interviews. A community sample of 313 participants completed measures of personality (i.e., extraversion, neuroticism, conscientiousness) and self-monitoring, and a domain-specific measure of beliefs about faking job interviews based on the theory of planned behaviour, which measured attitudes, subjective norms, and perceived behavioural control. Results indicated that the measure of attitudes was the strongest predictor of intention to fake. In line with the compatibility principle, the domain-specific measures based on the theory of planned behaviour correlated much more strongly with intentions to fake job interviews than did the general measures of personality or self-monitoring. Of the dispositional measures, lower conscientiousness, higher neuroticism, and higher self-monitoring was associated with greater intention to fake job interviews. The findings support a model whereby the effect of personality on intentions is partially mediated by domain-specific beliefs.
Language eng
DOI 10.1017/orp.2015.7
Field of Research 170107 Industrial and Organisational Psychology
Socio Economic Objective 970117 Expanding Knowledge in Psychology and Cognitive Sciences
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2015, Cambridge University Press
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30079213

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Psychology
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Created: Thu, 29 Oct 2015, 14:54:29 EST

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