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Eat, drink and gamble: marketing messages about 'risky' products in an Australian major sporting series

Lindsay, Sophie, Thomas, Samantha, Lewis, Sophie, Westberg, Kate, Moodie, Rob and Jones, Sandra 2013, Eat, drink and gamble: marketing messages about 'risky' products in an Australian major sporting series, BMC public health, vol. 13, pp. 1-11, doi: 10.1186/1471-2458-13-719.

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Title Eat, drink and gamble: marketing messages about 'risky' products in an Australian major sporting series
Author(s) Lindsay, Sophie
Thomas, Samantha
Lewis, Sophie
Westberg, Kate
Moodie, Rob
Jones, Sandra
Journal name BMC public health
Volume number 13
Article ID 719
Start page 1
End page 11
Total pages 11
Publisher BioMed Central
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2013-01
ISSN 1471-2458
Keyword(s) Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Public, Environmental & Occupational Health
PUBLIC, ENVIRONMENTAL & OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH, SCI
CONSUMER SOCIALIZATION
TOBACCO SPONSORSHIP
ALCOHOL
EXPOSURE
COMPANIES
INDUSTRY
CONSUMPTION
TELEVISION
INTENTIONS
Summary BACKGROUND: To investigate the alcohol, gambling, and unhealthy food marketing strategies during a nationally televised, free to air, sporting series in Australia.

METHODS/APPROACH: Using the Australian National Rugby League 2012 State of Origin three-game series, we conducted a mixed methods content analysis of the frequency, duration, placement and content of advertising strategies, comparing these strategies both within and across the three games.

RESULTS: There were a total of 4445 episodes (mean = 1481.67, SD = 336.58), and 233.23 minutes (mean = 77.74, SD = 7.31) of marketing for alcoholic beverages, gambling products and unhealthy foods and non-alcoholic beverages during the 360 minutes of televised coverage of the three State of Origin 2012 games. This included an average per game of 1354 episodes (SD = 368.79) and 66.29 minutes (SD = 7.62) of alcohol marketing; 110.67 episodes (SD = 43.89), and 8.72 minutes (SD = 1.29) of gambling marketing; and 17 episodes (SD = 7.55), and 2.74 minutes (SD = 0.78) of unhealthy food and beverage marketing. Content analysis revealed that there was a considerable embedding of product marketing within the match play, including within match commentary, sporting equipment, and special replays.

CONCLUSIONS: Sport is increasingly used as a vehicle for the promotion of range of 'risky consumption' products. This study raises important ethical and health policy questions about the extent and impact of saturation and incidental marketing strategies on health and wellbeing, the transparency of embedded marketing strategies, and how these strategies may influence product consumption.
Language eng
DOI 10.1186/1471-2458-13-719
Field of Research 111799 Public Health and Health Services not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 920499 Public Health (excl. Specific Population Health) not elsewhere classified
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2013, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30079250

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Health and Social Development
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.