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Art as parodic practice

Campbell, Marion May, Hecq, Dominique, Keane, Jondi and Pont, Antonia 2015, Art as parodic practice, Text, vol. 19, no. Special Issue 33, October, pp. 1-14.

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Title Art as parodic practice
Author(s) Campbell, Marion MayORCID iD for Campbell, Marion May orcid.org/0000-0002-2057-7398
Hecq, Dominique
Keane, JondiORCID iD for Keane, Jondi orcid.org/0000-0002-6553-3313
Pont, AntoniaORCID iD for Pont, Antonia orcid.org/0000-0001-5194-0789
Journal name Text
Volume number 19
Issue number Special Issue 33
Season October
Start page 1
End page 14
Total pages 14
Publisher Australian Association of Writing Programs
Place of publication Gold Coast, Qld
Publication date 2015-10-17
ISSN 1327-9556
Summary Perhaps because of the pervasive sampling, remixing, rehashing and promiscuous citational blending in postmodernity, where quote marks dissolve, parody has come to be seen as a somewhat archaic concept, pertaining to cultures more stably codified and hierarchically ordered, rather than subject to the fluctuations of global markets and phantasmagoric projections affecting the flow of investment moneys. Given the anxiogenic nature of postmodernity under its various guises, willed as hypermodernityand metamodernity or supermodernity, the ideologeme ‘parody’ might be seen as nostalgic symptom in the wake of the ‘grand narratives’ (Lyotard 1984 [1979]) – a rehearsed post-apocalyptic nostalgia for a world of neo-feudalism and fiefdoms, where the seasonal lifting of prohibition for carnival brought on the ‘allowed fool’ (Shakespeare 2006) for parody’s brief upending of the hierarchical order, when high became low, mouth met anus, and wise became mad, even within the Pater Noster of the Holy Mass. (Bakhtin 1980: 78). How the revisitation of parody might illuminate contemporary cultural politics is a driving question behind this collection, a questionmade more urgent by recent global developments of terror.
Language eng
Field of Research 199999 Studies in Creative Arts and Writing not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 970119 Expanding Knowledge through Studies of the Creative Arts and Writing
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2015, Australasian Association of Writing Programs (AAWP)
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30079282

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Communication and Creative Arts
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.