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Having sex with capitalism: parodic in-citation in the prose poem sequence

Campbell, Marion May 2015, Having sex with capitalism: parodic in-citation in the prose poem sequence, Text, vol. 19, no. Special Issue 33, October, pp. 1-17.

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Title Having sex with capitalism: parodic in-citation in the prose poem sequence
Author(s) Campbell, Marion MayORCID iD for Campbell, Marion May orcid.org/0000-0002-2057-7398
Journal name Text
Volume number 19
Issue number Special Issue 33
Season October
Start page 1
End page 17
Total pages 17
Publisher Australian Association of Writing Programs
Place of publication Gold Coast, Qld
Publication date 2015-10-30
ISSN 1327-9556
Keyword(s) Creative Writing
parody
prose poem
subjects of consumption
queering parody
Summary In his Spleen de Paris or Petits poèmes en prose [Little Prose Poems] Baudelaire (1869) forges an instrument of supple and radical potential, declaring the prose poem a ‘dangerous’ hybrid, which he wills elastic enough and staccato enough, to register the flows, jolts and distractions for the flâneur in the increasingly industrialised Paris. Here,by the mid-19th century, plate glass and gas lighting enable conspicuous consumption. Itis most strikingly the romantic-erotic and the relation between poet and his delicious, execrable wife, his inescapable, pitiless Muse (Baudelaire 1989: 177] that provides the nexus for radical questioning of the whole socio-political economy. Departing from Johnson’s Défigurations (1979) and using Irigaray’s (1984) hypothesis that the economy of sexual difference is the founding trope for the discursive and thus political economy of differences – of culture, ethnicity and class – this article first looks at theway Baudelaire activates the heterosexual relation as a site for social critique. It examines how Perec continues Baudelaire’s prose poetry experiment, offering, pre-May 1968, a revolutionary critique of desire by exploiting formal constraints to deconstruct still further the consumer subject of capitalism. It then investigates Brossard’s ‘hologrammatic’ challenge (1991) to patriarchal regimes of representation and the forms of desire they outlaw. Finally, it suggests how new work by Walwicz (2015)develops and displaces this radical inheritance.
Language eng
Field of Research 199999 Studies in Creative Arts and Writing not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 970119 Expanding Knowledge through Studies of the Creative Arts and Writing
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2015, Australasian Association of Writing Programs (AAWP)
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30079283

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Communication and Creative Arts
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.