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Mixed feelings: Anglo-Indians and the distribution of the sensible in Indian cinema

D'Cruz, Glenn 2014, Mixed feelings: Anglo-Indians and the distribution of the sensible in Indian cinema, in Proceedings of the 7th annual Film-Philosophy Conference: A World of Cinemas 2014, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, Scotland, pp. 1-4.

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Title Mixed feelings: Anglo-Indians and the distribution of the sensible in Indian cinema
Author(s) D'Cruz, GlennORCID iD for D'Cruz, Glenn orcid.org/0000-0002-6438-1725
Conference name Film-Philosophy Conference (7th: 2014: University of Glasgow)
Conference location Glasgow, Scotland
Conference dates 2 - 4 Jul.- 2014
Title of proceedings Proceedings of the 7th annual Film-Philosophy Conference: A World of Cinemas 2014
Publication date 2014
Start page 1
End page 4
Total pages 4
Publisher University of Glasgow
Place of publication Glasgow, Scotland
Keyword(s) Anglo-Indians in Cinema
Colonialism and Cinema
Summary Hollywood, and various regional cinemas in India typically represent Mixed-Race Anglo-Indians as a degenerate community marked by lax morals, alcoholism, and indolence. These stereotypical tropes typically generate indignant protests from members of this miniscule Indian community, and debates about the representation of Anglo-Indians focus on the injustices propagated by such stereotypes. This paper rethinks Anglo-Indian representation in cinema by drawing on Jacques Rancière’s concept of ‘the distribution of the sensible,’ which provides a cartography for understanding how one’s various identity assignations structure sensory experience. In other words those who are marginalized have ways of seeing and hearing from those occupy normative or dominant subject positions, and these differences are best approached in terms of neo-Kantian aesthetic judgment. It also argues, with Rancière, that ‘inequality’ is built into the distribution of the sensible. Drawing on a number of Indian and Hollywood films — including Aparna Sen’s 36 Chowringhee Lane (1981) Anjan Dutt’s Bada Din (1998) Ismail Merchant’s Cotton Mary (2000), Bow Barracks Forever (2004) and Harry McClure’s Going Away (2013) — the paper contends that Rancière’s ‘distribution of the sensible’ allows us to think through a politics that is connected to ‘aesthetic judgement’ as well as a politics of differentiation that informs our understanding of the function of minoritarian characters in narrative cinema.
Language eng
Field of Research 190201 Cinema Studies
Socio Economic Objective 950204 The Media
HERDC Research category E2.1 Full written paper - non-refereed / Abstract reviewed
Copyright notice ©2014, University of Glasgow
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30079301

Document type: Conference Paper
Collection: School of Communication and Creative Arts
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