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Histological, growth and 7-ethoxyresorufin 0-deethylase (EROD) activity responses of greenback flounder Rhombosolea tapirina to contaminated marine sediment and diet

Mondon, J.A., Duda, S. and Nowak, B.F. 2001, Histological, growth and 7-ethoxyresorufin 0-deethylase (EROD) activity responses of greenback flounder Rhombosolea tapirina to contaminated marine sediment and diet, Aquatic toxicology, vol. 54, no. 3-4, pp. 231-247, doi: 10.1016/S0166-445X(01)00146-1.

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Title Histological, growth and 7-ethoxyresorufin 0-deethylase (EROD) activity responses of greenback flounder Rhombosolea tapirina to contaminated marine sediment and diet
Author(s) Mondon, J.A.ORCID iD for Mondon, J.A. orcid.org/0000-0002-0643-7540
Duda, S.
Nowak, B.F.
Journal name Aquatic toxicology
Volume number 54
Issue number 3-4
Start page 231
End page 247
Total pages 17
Publisher Elsevier
Place of publication Amsterdam, The Netherlands
Publication date 2001-10
ISSN 0166-445X
Keyword(s) Flounder
Histology
EROD
Summary Pathological abnormalities and mixed function oxygenase (MFO) enzyme changes are frequently used as indicators of anthropogenic contaminant exposure and effect. However, there is a paucity of research investigating the effects of contaminated sediment on native Australian benthic teleosts. As part of an ecotoxicological assessment of contaminated marine sediments in northern Tasmania, CYP1A induction, histological and growth response of the greenback flounder, Rhombosolea tapirina, exposed to contaminated marine sediments were examined. Hatchery reared flounder were exposed to reference sediment, contaminated sediment or contaminated sediment and diet for 6 weeks. CYP1A induction, using the ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase (EROD) assay, and the histological and growth response in the flounder were examined on cessation of the exposure trial. Significant differences were found between treatments in histological, growth and EROD response. Exposure to contaminated sediment and diet elicited a multi-organ histological response: principally partial and total epidermal erosion and multifocal necrosis of the liver. The prevalence of total epidermal erosion was greatest with exposure to disturbed contaminated sediment (66.65±16.65%). The prevalence of multifocal necrosis of the liver was greatest with exposure to contaminanted sediment and diet (66.65±16.65%). Growth reduction, measured as percentage growth inhibition, was evident in flounder exposed to contaminated sediment and diet (18.2±11.99%). Additionally, exposure to contaminated sediment and diet elicited elevated induction of the EROD liver detoxification enzyme (139.65±24.22 pmol/min/mg protein) compared to exposure to contaminated sediment and non-contaminated diet (6.25±0.81 pmol/min/mg) indicating the presence and potential bioavailability of xenobiotics via food. Further, more inhibited growth and histological alteration associated with exposure to contaminated sediment and diet suggest contaminants in Deceitful Cove sediment are cytotoxic.
Language eng
DOI 10.1016/S0166-445X(01)00146-1
Field of Research 050204 Environmental Impact Assessment
070402 Aquatic Ecosystem Studies and Stock Assessment
06 Biological Sciences
05 Environmental Sciences
03 Chemical Sciences
Socio Economic Objective 960507 Ecosystem Assessment and Management of Marine Environments
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2001, Elsevier
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30079357

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