Change of school in early adolescence and adverse obesity-related dietary behavior: a longitudinal cohort study, Victoria, Australia, 2013-2014

Marks, Jennifer, Barnett, Lisa M.  and Allender, Steven 2015, Change of school in early adolescence and adverse obesity-related dietary behavior: a longitudinal cohort study, Victoria, Australia, 2013-2014, Preventing chronic diseases: public health research, practice, and policy, vol. 12, Article Number : E145, pp. 1-11, doi: 10.5888/pcd12.150042.

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Title Change of school in early adolescence and adverse obesity-related dietary behavior: a longitudinal cohort study, Victoria, Australia, 2013-2014
Author(s) Marks, JenniferORCID iD for Marks, Jennifer orcid.org/0000-0002-4551-7332
Barnett, Lisa M. ORCID iD for Barnett, Lisa M.  orcid.org/0000-0002-9731-625X
Allender, StevenORCID iD for Allender, Steven orcid.org/0000-0002-4842-3294
Journal name Preventing chronic diseases: public health research, practice, and policy
Volume number 12
Season Article Number : E145
Start page 1
End page 11
Total pages 11
Publisher National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion
Place of publication Atlanta, Ga.
Publication date 2015-09-10
ISSN 1545-1151
Summary INTRODUCTION: Environments that facilitate energy-dense, nutrient-poor diets are associated with childhood obesity. We examined the effect of a change of school environment on the prevalence of obesity and related dietary behavior in early adolescence. METHODS: Fifteen schools in Victoria, Australia, were recruited at random from the bottom 2 strata of a 5-level socioeconomic scale. In 9 schools, students in grade 6 primary school transitioned to different schools for grade 7 secondary school, whereas in 6 schools, students remained in the same school from grade 6 to grade 7. Time 1 measures were collected from students (N = 245) in grade 6 (aged 11-13 y). Time 2 data were collected from 243 (99%) of the original cohort in grade 7. Data collected were dietary recall self-reported by students via questionnaire, measured height and weight of students, and aspects of the school food environment via school staff survey. Comparative and mixed model regression analyses were conducted. RESULTS: Of 243 students, 63% (n = 152) changed schools from time 1 to time 2, with no significant difference in weight status. Students who changed schools reported an increase in purchases of after-school snack food, greater sweetened beverage intake, fewer fruit-and-vegetable classroom breaks, and less encouragement for healthy eating compared with students who remained in the same school. School staff surveys showed that more primary than secondary schools had written healthy canteen policies and fewer days of canteen or food services operation. CONCLUSION: A change of school environment has negative effects on children's obesity-related dietary behavior. Consistent policy is needed across school types to support healthy eating in school environments.
Language eng
DOI 10.5888/pcd12.150042
Field of Research 111712 Health Promotion
Socio Economic Objective 920205 Health Education and Promotion
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2015, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30079363

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Faculty of Health
Population Health
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