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Loss and re-adaptation of lumbar intervertebral disc water signal intensity after prolonged bedrest

Kordi, M., Belavý, D.L., Armbrecht, G., Sheikh, A., Felsenberg, D. and Trudel, G. 2015, Loss and re-adaptation of lumbar intervertebral disc water signal intensity after prolonged bedrest, Journal of musculoskeletal and neuronal interactions, vol. 15, no. 3, pp. 294-300.

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Title Loss and re-adaptation of lumbar intervertebral disc water signal intensity after prolonged bedrest
Author(s) Kordi, M.
Belavý, D.L.ORCID iD for Belavý, D.L. orcid.org/0000-0002-9307-832X
Armbrecht, G.
Sheikh, A.
Felsenberg, D.
Trudel, G.
Journal name Journal of musculoskeletal and neuronal interactions
Volume number 15
Issue number 3
Start page 294
End page 300
Total pages 7
Publisher International Society of Musculoskeletal and Neuronal Interactions
Place of publication Kifissia, Greece
Publication date 2015-09
ISSN 1108-7161
Summary © 2015, International Society of Musculoskeletal and Neuronal Interactions. All right reserved. The adaptation and re-adaptation process of the intervertebral disc (IVD) to prolonged bedrest is important for understanding IVD physiology and IVD herniations in astronauts. Little information is available on changes in IVD composition. In this study, 24 male subjects underwent 60-day bedrest and In/Out Phase magnetic resonance imaging sequences were performed to evaluate IVD shape and water signal intensity. Scanning was performed before bedrest (baseline), twice during bedrest, and three, six and twenty-four months after bedrest. Area, signal intensity, average height, and anteroposterior diameter of the lumbar L3/4 and L4/5 IVDs were measured. At the end of bedrest, disc height and area were significantly increased with no change in water signal intensity. After bedrest, we observed reduced IVD signal intensity three months (p=0.004 versus baseline), six months (p=0.003 versus baseline), but not twenty-four months (p=0.25 versus baseline) post-bedrest. At these same time points post-bedrest, IVD height and area remained increased. The reduced lumbar IVD water signal intensity in the first months after bedrest implies a reduction of glycosaminoglycans and/or free water in the IVD. Subsequently, at two years after bedrest, IVD hydration status returned towards pre-bedrest levels, suggesting a gradual, but slow, re-adaptation process of the IVD after prolonged bedrest.
Language eng
Field of Research 110699 Human Movement and Sports Science not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 920299 Health and Support Services not elsewhere classified
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2015, International Society of Musculoskeletal and Neuronal Interactions
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30079459

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.