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You just change the channel if you don't like what you're going to hear: gamblers' attitudes towards, and interactions with, social marketing campaigns

Thomas, Samantha L., Lewis, Sophie and Westberg, Kate 2015, You just change the channel if you don't like what you're going to hear: gamblers' attitudes towards, and interactions with, social marketing campaigns, Health expectations, vol. 18, no. 1, pp. 124-136, doi: 10.1111/hex.12018.

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Title You just change the channel if you don't like what you're going to hear: gamblers' attitudes towards, and interactions with, social marketing campaigns
Author(s) Thomas, Samantha L.ORCID iD for Thomas, Samantha L. orcid.org/0000-0003-1427-7775
Lewis, Sophie
Westberg, Kate
Journal name Health expectations
Volume number 18
Issue number 1
Start page 124
End page 136
Total pages 13
Publisher Wiley
Place of publication England
Publication date 2015-02
ISSN 1369-7625
Keyword(s) gambling
problem gambling
public health
risk
social marketing
unintended consequences
Summary OBJECTIVES: To investigate how gamblers interact with, and respond to, downstream social marketing campaigns that focus on the risks and harms of problem gambling and/or encourage help seeking. METHODS: Qualitative study of 100 gamblers with a range of gambling behaviours (from non-problem to problem gambling). We used a Social Constructivist approach. Our constant comparative method of data interpretation focused on how participants' experiences and interactions with gambling influenced their opinions towards, and interactions with social marketing campaigns. RESULTS: Three key themes emerged from the narratives. (i) Participants felt that campaigns were heavily skewed towards encouraging individuals to take personal responsibility for their gambling behaviours or were targeted towards those with severe gambling problems. (ii) Participants described the difficulty for campaigns to achieve 'cut through' because of the overwhelming volume of positive messages about the benefits of gambling that were given by the gambling industry. (iii) Some participants described that dominant discourses about personal responsibility prevented them from seeking help and reinforced perceptions of stigma. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS: Social marketing campaigns have an important role to play in the prevention of gambling risk behaviours and the promotion of help seeking. Social marketers should explore how to more effectively target campaigns to different audience segments, understand the role of environmental factors in undermining the uptake of social marketing strategies and anticipate the potential unforeseen consequences of social marketing strategies.
Language eng
DOI 10.1111/hex.12018
Field of Research 111799 Public Health and Health Services not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 929999 Health not elsewhere classified
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2012, John Wiley & Sons
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30079474

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Health and Social Development
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