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Greater association of peak neuromuscular performance with cortical bone geometry, bone mass and bone strength than bone density : a study in 417 older women

Belavý, Daniel L., Armbrecht, Gabriele, Blenk, Tilo, Bock, Oliver, Börst, Hendrikje, Kocakaya, Emine, Luhn, Franziska, Rantalainen, Timo, Rawer, Rainer, Tomasius, Frederike, Willnecker, Johannes and Felsenberg, Dieter 2016, Greater association of peak neuromuscular performance with cortical bone geometry, bone mass and bone strength than bone density : a study in 417 older women, Bone, vol. 83, pp. 119-126.

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Title Greater association of peak neuromuscular performance with cortical bone geometry, bone mass and bone strength than bone density : a study in 417 older women
Author(s) Belavý, Daniel L.ORCID iD for Belavý, Daniel L. orcid.org/0000-0002-9307-832X
Armbrecht, Gabriele
Blenk, Tilo
Bock, Oliver
Börst, Hendrikje
Kocakaya, Emine
Luhn, Franziska
Rantalainen, TimoORCID iD for Rantalainen, Timo orcid.org/0000-0001-6977-4782
Rawer, Rainer
Tomasius, Frederike
Willnecker, Johannes
Felsenberg, Dieter
Journal name Bone
Volume number 83
Start page 119
End page 126
Total pages 8
Publisher Elsevier
Place of publication Amsterdam, The Netherlands
Publication date 2016-02
ISSN 1873-2763
Keyword(s) exercise
function
osteoporosis
sarcopenia
Summary BACKGROUND: We evaluated which aspects of neuromuscular performance are associated with bone mass, density, strength and geometry. METHODS: 417 women aged 60-94years were examined. Countermovement jump, sit-to-stand test, grip strength, forearm and calf muscle cross-sectional area, areal bone mineral content and density (aBMC and aBMD) at the hip and lumbar spine via dual X-ray absorptiometry, and measures of volumetric vBMC and vBMD, bone geometry and section modulus at 4% and 66% of radius length and 4%, 38% and 66% of tibia length via peripheral quantitative computed tomography were performed. The first principal component of the neuromuscular variables was calculated to generate a summary neuromuscular variable. Percentage of total variance in bone parameters explained by the neuromuscular parameters was calculated. Step-wise regression was also performed. RESULTS: At all pQCT bone sites (radius, ulna, tibia, fibula), a greater percentage of total variance in measures of bone mass, cortical geometry and/or bone strength was explained by peak neuromuscular performance than for vBMD. Sit-to-stand performance did not relate strongly to bone parameters. No obvious differential in the explanatory power of neuromuscular performance was seen for DXA aBMC versus aBMD. In step-wise regression, bone mass, cortical morphology, and/or strength remained significant in relation to the first principal component of the neuromuscular variables. In no case was vBMD positively related to neuromuscular performance in the final step-wise regression models. CONCLUSION: Peak neuromuscular performance has a stronger relationship with leg and forearm bone mass and cortical geometry as well as proximal forearm section modulus than with vBMD.
Language eng
Field of Research 110602 Exercise Physiology
Socio Economic Objective 920507 Women's Health
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2015, Elsevier
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30079497

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