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Evaluating discussion board engagement in the MoodSwings online self-help program for bipolar disorder: protocol for an observational prospective cohort study

Gliddon, Emma, Lauder, Sue, Berk, Lesley, Cosgrove, Victoria, Grimm, David, Dodd, Seetal, Suppes, Trisha and Berk, Michael 2015, Evaluating discussion board engagement in the MoodSwings online self-help program for bipolar disorder: protocol for an observational prospective cohort study, BMC psychiatry, vol. 15, Article Number : 243, pp. 1-9, doi: 10.1186/s12888-015-0630-7.

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Title Evaluating discussion board engagement in the MoodSwings online self-help program for bipolar disorder: protocol for an observational prospective cohort study
Author(s) Gliddon, Emma
Lauder, Sue
Berk, LesleyORCID iD for Berk, Lesley orcid.org/0000-0002-3677-7503
Cosgrove, Victoria
Grimm, David
Dodd, SeetalORCID iD for Dodd, Seetal orcid.org/0000-0002-7918-4636
Suppes, Trisha
Berk, MichaelORCID iD for Berk, Michael orcid.org/0000-0002-5554-6946
Journal name BMC psychiatry
Volume number 15
Season Article Number : 243
Start page 1
End page 9
Total pages 9
Publisher BioMed Central
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2015
ISSN 1471-244X
Keyword(s) Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Psychiatry
Bipolar disorder
Internet
Online
Support group
Mental health
Summary BACKGROUND: Online, self-guided programs exist for a wide range of mental health conditions, including bipolar disorder, and discussion boards are often part of these interventions. The impact engagement with these discussion boards has on the psychosocial well-being of users is largely unknown. More specifically we need to clarify the influence of the type and level of engagement on outcomes. The primary aim of this exploratory study is to determine if there is a relationship between different types (active, passive or none) and levels (high, mid and low) of discussion board engagement and improvement in outcome measures from baseline to follow up, with a focus on self-reported social support, stigma, quality of life and levels of depression and mania. The secondary aim of this study is to identify any differences in demographic variables among discussion users.

METHODS/DESIGN: The present study is a sub-study of the MoodSwings 2.0 3-arm randomised controlled trial (discussion board only (arm 1), discussion board plus psychoeducation (arm 2), discussion board, psychoeducation plus cognitive behavioural therapy-based tools (arm 3)). Discussion engagement will be measured via online participant activity monitoring. Assessments include online self-report as well as blinded phone interviews at baseline, 3, 6, 9 and 12 months follow up.

DISCUSSION: The results of this study will help to inform future programs about whether or not discussion boards are a beneficial inclusion in online self-help interventions. It will also help to determine if motivating users to actively engage in online discussion is necessary, and if so, what level of engagement is optimal to produce the most benefit. Future programs may benefit through being able to identify those most likely to poorly engage, based on demographic variables, so motivational strategies can be targeted accordingly.
Language eng
DOI 10.1186/s12888-015-0630-7
Field of Research 1103 Clinical Sciences
Socio Economic Objective 920410 Mental Health
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2015, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30079499

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Psychology
School of Medicine
Open Access Collection
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Created: Thu, 26 Nov 2015, 13:51:27 EST

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.