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Explaining psychological insulin resistance in adults with non-insulin-treated type 2 diabetes: the roles of diabetes distress and current medication concerns. Results from diabetes MILES-Australia.

Holmes-Truscott, E, Skinner, T. C., Pouwer, F. and Speight, J 2016, Explaining psychological insulin resistance in adults with non-insulin-treated type 2 diabetes: the roles of diabetes distress and current medication concerns. Results from diabetes MILES-Australia., Primary care diabetes, vol. 10, no. 1, pp. 75-82, doi: 10.1016/j.pcd.2015.06.006.

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Title Explaining psychological insulin resistance in adults with non-insulin-treated type 2 diabetes: the roles of diabetes distress and current medication concerns. Results from diabetes MILES-Australia.
Author(s) Holmes-Truscott, EORCID iD for Holmes-Truscott, E orcid.org/0000-0001-9139-4663
Skinner, T. C.
Pouwer, F.
Speight, JORCID iD for Speight, J orcid.org/0000-0002-1204-6896
Journal name Primary care diabetes
Volume number 10
Issue number 1
Start page 75
End page 82
Total pages 8
Publisher Elsevier
Place of publication Amsterdam, The Netherlands
Publication date 2016-02
ISSN 1878-0210
Keyword(s) Beliefs about medications
Diabetes distress
Psychological insulin resistance
Type 2 diabetes
Summary AIMS: To investigate the contribution of general and diabetes-specific emotional wellbeing and beliefs about medicines in the prediction of insulin therapy appraisals in adults with non-insulin-treated type 2 diabetes. METHODS: The sample included Diabetes MILES-Australia cross-sectional survey participants whose primary diabetes treatment was oral hypoglycaemic agents (N=313; 49% women; mean±SD age: 57±9 years; diabetes duration: 7±6 years). They completed validated measures of beliefs about the 'harm' and 'overuse' of medications in general (BMQ General); 'concerns' about and 'necessity' of current diabetes medications (BMQ Specific); negative insulin therapy appraisals (ITAS); depression (PHQ-9); anxiety (GAD-7), and diabetes distress (DDS-17). Factors associated with ITAS Negative scores were examined using hierarchical multiple regressions. RESULTS: Twenty-two percent of the variance in ITAS Negative scores (52±10), was explained by: number of complications (β=-.15, p=.005), DDS-17 subscale 'emotional burden' (β=.23, p<.001), and 'concerns' about current diabetes treatment (β=.29, p<.001). General beliefs about medications and general emotional wellbeing did not contribute significantly to the model. CONCLUSIONS: Psychological insulin resistance may reflect broader distress about diabetes and concerns about its treatment but not general beliefs about medicines, depression or anxiety. Reducing diabetes distress and current treatment concerns may improve attitudes towards insulin as a potential therapeutic option.
Language eng
DOI 10.1016/j.pcd.2015.06.006
Field of Research 1103 Clinical Sciences
110306 Endocrinology
Socio Economic Objective 920401 Behaviour and Health
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2015, Primary Care Diabetes Europe
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30079602

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Psychology
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Created: Wed, 06 Jan 2016, 13:23:00 EST

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