Improving communication when seeking informed consent: a randomised controlled study of a computer-based method for providing information to prospective clinical trial participants

Karunaratne, Asuntha S., Korenman, Stanley G., Thomas, Samantha L., Myles, Paul S. and Komesaroff, Paul A. 2010, Improving communication when seeking informed consent: a randomised controlled study of a computer-based method for providing information to prospective clinical trial participants, Medical journal of Australia, vol. 192, no. 7, pp. 388-392.

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Title Improving communication when seeking informed consent: a randomised controlled study of a computer-based method for providing information to prospective clinical trial participants
Author(s) Karunaratne, Asuntha S.
Korenman, Stanley G.
Thomas, Samantha L.ORCID iD for Thomas, Samantha L. orcid.org/0000-0003-1427-7775
Myles, Paul S.
Komesaroff, Paul A.
Journal name Medical journal of Australia
Volume number 192
Issue number 7
Start page 388
End page 392
Total pages 5
Publisher Australasian Medical Publishing Company
Place of publication Sydney, N.S.W.
Publication date 2010
ISSN 0025-729X
Keyword(s) Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Medicine, General & Internal
General & Internal Medicine
PHASE-I
COMPREHENSION
EDUCATION
VIDEOTAPE
EFFICACY
DOCUMENT
LEARNER
SCIENCE
SURGERY
FORMS
Summary OBJECTIVE: To assess the efficacy, with respect to participant understanding of information, of a computer-based approach to communication about complex, technical issues that commonly arise when seeking informed consent for clinical research trials. DESIGN, SETTING AND PARTICIPANTS: An open, randomised controlled study of 60 patients with diabetes mellitus, aged 27-70 years, recruited between August 2006 and October 2007 from the Department of Diabetes and Endocrinology at the Alfred Hospital and Baker IDI Heart and Diabetes Institute, Melbourne. INTERVENTION: Participants were asked to read information about a mock study via a computer-based presentation (n = 30) or a conventional paper-based information statement (n = 30). The computer-based presentation contained visual aids, including diagrams, video, hyperlinks and quiz pages. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Understanding of information as assessed by quantitative and qualitative means. RESULTS: Assessment scores used to measure level of understanding were significantly higher in the group that completed the computer-based task than the group that completed the paper-based task (82% v 73%; P = 0.005). More participants in the group that completed the computer-based task expressed interest in taking part in the mock study (23 v 17 participants; P = 0.01). Most participants from both groups preferred the idea of a computer-based presentation to the paper-based statement (21 in the computer-based task group, 18 in the paper-based task group). CONCLUSIONS: A computer-based method of providing information may help overcome existing deficiencies in communication about clinical research, and may reduce costs and improve efficiency in recruiting participants for clinical trials.
Language eng
Field of Research 111799 Public Health and Health Services not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 920499 Public Health (excl. Specific Population Health) not elsewhere classified
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2010, Australasian Medical Publishing Company
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30079615

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Faculty of Health
School of Health and Social Development
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