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Complementary medicine use among people living with HIV/AIDS in Victoria, Australia: practices, attitudes and perceptions

Thomas, S. L., Lam, K., Piterman, L., Mijch, A. and Komesaroff, P. A. 2007, Complementary medicine use among people living with HIV/AIDS in Victoria, Australia: practices, attitudes and perceptions, International journal of STD and AIDS, vol. 18, no. 7, pp. 453-457, doi: 10.1258/095646207781147292.

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Title Complementary medicine use among people living with HIV/AIDS in Victoria, Australia: practices, attitudes and perceptions
Author(s) Thomas, S. L.ORCID iD for Thomas, S. L. orcid.org/0000-0003-1427-7775
Lam, K.
Piterman, L.
Mijch, A.
Komesaroff, P. A.
Journal name International journal of STD and AIDS
Volume number 18
Issue number 7
Start page 453
End page 457
Total pages 5
Publisher Sage
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2007-07-01
ISSN 0956-4624
Keyword(s) Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Immunology
Infectious Diseases
HIV
CAMs
complementary
women
qualitative
HIV-INFECTED PATIENTS
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
MITOCHONDRIAL TOXICITY
UNITED-STATES
THERAPIES
MEN
GAY
Summary There is limited evidence suggesting the underlying reasons for the use of complementary and alternative medicines (CAMs) by people with HIV/AIDS, or individual attitudes and beliefs about the use of CAMs. Using focus groups and a survey with 151 individuals attending the HIV Clinics at The Alfred Hospital, Melbourne, we aimed to provide insights into factors that influence the use of CAMs among people living with HIV/AIDS. Roughly half (49%) of the participants had used CAMs to manage their HIV/AIDs. Users of CAMs utilized a wide range of treatments in managing their condition, but costs of the CAMs meant that users were not necessarily able to use them as much as they might have liked. Use of CAMs was based on a desire to find something beneficial rather than on being dissatisfied with conventional medicine. Further research is needed into (a) the effects of CAMs and (b) the enhancement of communication and collaboration between patients, doctors and complementary medicine practitioners.
Language eng
DOI 10.1258/095646207781147292
Field of Research 1103 Clinical Sciences
Socio Economic Objective 920109 Infectious Diseases
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2007, Sage
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30079619

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Health and Social Development
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