Development, implementation and evaluation of an interprofessional graduate program for nursing-paramedicine double-degree graduates

Considine, Julie, Walker, Tony and Berry, Debra 2015, Development, implementation and evaluation of an interprofessional graduate program for nursing-paramedicine double-degree graduates, Australian health review, vol. 39, no. 5, pp. 595-599, doi: 10.1071/AH14258.

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Title Development, implementation and evaluation of an interprofessional graduate program for nursing-paramedicine double-degree graduates
Author(s) Considine, JulieORCID iD for Considine, Julie orcid.org/0000-0003-3801-2456
Walker, Tony
Berry, DebraORCID iD for Berry, Debra orcid.org/0000-0002-8780-054X
Journal name Australian health review
Volume number 39
Issue number 5
Start page 595
End page 599
Total pages 5
Publisher CSIRO Publishing
Place of publication Melbourne, Vic.
Publication date 2015-11
ISSN 0156-5788
Summary Over the past decade, several Australian universities have offered a double degree in nursing and paramedicine. Mainstream employment models that facilitate integrated graduate practice in both nursing and paramedicine are currently lacking. The aim of the present study was to detail the development of the Interprofessional Graduate Program (IPG), the industrial and professional issues that required solutions, outcomes from the first pilot IPG group and future directions. The IPG was an 18-month program during which participants rotated between graduate nursing experience in emergency nursing at Northern Health, Melbourne, Australia and graduate paramedic experience with Ambulance Victoria. The first IPG with 10 participants ran from January 2011 to August 2012. A survey completed by nine of the 10 participants in March 2014 showed that all nine participants nominated Ambulance Victoria as their main employer and five participants were working casual shifts in nursing. Alternative graduate programs that span two health disciplines are feasible but hampered by rigid industrial relations structures and professional ideologies. Despite a 'purpose built' graduate program that spanned two disciplines, traditional organisational structures still hamper double-degree graduates using all of skills to full capacity, and force the selection of one dominant profession.
Language eng
DOI 10.1071/AH14258
Field of Research 1117 Public Health And Health Services
1605 Policy And Administration
1110 Nursing
111003 Clinical Nursing: Secondary (Acute Care)
Socio Economic Objective 920210 Nursing
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2015, CSIRO
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30079667

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