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Deep ecology and Australian suburbia: learning from Aboriginal Australia philosophy

Wissing, Ross, Jones, David and Boontharm, Davisi 2015, Deep ecology and Australian suburbia: learning from Aboriginal Australia philosophy, in ISDRS 2015 : Vulnerability and Adaptive Capacity. Proceedings of 21st International Sustainable Development Research Society Conference, International Sustainable Development Research Society, [Geelong, Vic.], pp. 1-11.

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Title Deep ecology and Australian suburbia: learning from Aboriginal Australia philosophy
Author(s) Wissing, Ross
Jones, DavidORCID iD for Jones, David orcid.org/0000-0003-3990-5520
Boontharm, Davisi
Conference name International Sustainable Development Research Society Conference Tipping Point (21st : 2015 : Geelong, Victoria)
Conference location Geelong, Victoria
Conference dates 10-12 Jul. 2015
Title of proceedings ISDRS 2015 : Vulnerability and Adaptive Capacity. Proceedings of 21st International Sustainable Development Research Society Conference
Publication date 2015
Start page 1
End page 11
Total pages 11
Publisher International Sustainable Development Research Society
Place of publication [Geelong, Vic.]
Summary Naess’ Deep Ecology [50] represents a fundamental philosophical and conceptual shift from the dominant Western thinking that can be traced back to the Greek and Roman Empires. Like all philosophy, Naess’ Deep Ecology was born of and is most relevant to a specific time and place being northern Europe. Although the fundamentals of the Deep Ecology philosophy were new to modern Western thinking, it is not new to traditional Indigenous cultures, including the world’s oldest culture, that of Aboriginal Australia. While the past four decades has seen an increasing recognition of Aboriginal philosophical approaches, there is very little understanding of what this philosophical approach is and means for the management of the Australian environment in which humans are a central part. Since European arrival, Australia has been one of the world’s most urban societies. Unlike northern Europe, urban Australia is low density and suburban, a legacy of British and North American influences. Nearly 90% of Australians live in detached houses surrounded by gardens. Managed by individual residents, this land use accounts for about 70% of the total area of cities like Melbourne. Deeply culturally embedded, the Australian desire for living in low-density suburbs is unlikely to change soon. Contemporary cities are widely recognized as causing severe environmental degradation and are not sustainable. Yet in Australia introduced philosophical and design approaches are still used to address the unsustainable impacts of urban forms introduced from another time and place. While impractical to remove the existing suburban form in Australian cities, there is a significant opportunity to retrofit them using Australian Aboriginal philosophical and land management understandings developed and tested over tens of thousands of years. This paper establishes a contemporary Australian Deep Ecology philosophical approach to sustainably living in the suburbs that recognizes and works with the legacies of Australian Aboriginal, English, North American and contemporary Australian influences.
ISBN 9780730000211
Language eng
Field of Research 120107 Landscape Architecture
Socio Economic Objective 950302 Conserving Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Heritage
HERDC Research category E1 Full written paper - refereed
ERA Research output type E Conference publication
Copyright notice ©2015, ISDRS
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30079692

Document type: Conference Paper
Collection: School of Architecture and Built Environment
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