Indigenous sustainable land management practices: perspectives from Wadawurrung/Wathaurong Country

Dearnaley, Jennifer and Jones, David 2015, Indigenous sustainable land management practices: perspectives from Wadawurrung/Wathaurong Country, in ISDRS 2015 : Vulnerability and Adaptive Capacity. Proceedings of 21st International Sustainable Development Research Society Conference, International Sustainable Development Research Society, [Geelong, Vic.], pp. 1-11.

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Title Indigenous sustainable land management practices: perspectives from Wadawurrung/Wathaurong Country
Author(s) Dearnaley, Jennifer
Jones, DavidORCID iD for Jones, David orcid.org/0000-0003-3990-5520
Conference name International Sustainable Development Research Society Conference Tipping Point (21st : 2015 : Geelong, Victoria)
Conference location Geelong, Victoria
Conference dates 10-12 Jul. 2015
Title of proceedings ISDRS 2015 : Vulnerability and Adaptive Capacity. Proceedings of 21st International Sustainable Development Research Society Conference
Publication date 2015
Start page 1
End page 11
Total pages 11
Publisher International Sustainable Development Research Society
Place of publication [Geelong, Vic.]
Summary This paper discusses the role and potential of ethnobotany in Australian Aboriginal plant knowledge in supporting and enabling sustainable land management practices for land use developments. In particular, it draws upon the Wadawurrung / Wathaurong Country knowledge for the greater Geelong region of Australia, summarises recent investigations and research, offers a deeper insight into the risks of indigenous vegetation deterioration and opportunities relating to plant usage, and highlights the importance of this plant knowledge in sustainable land management practice. The focus of this investigation is upon the Wathaurong Country around the City of Greater Geelong, host city for the ISDRS conference, of which there is little published material and oral distillation.
The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate how the Wadawurrung / Wathaurong people survived for over 60,000 years through sustainable land management techniques, caring & healing themselves by holding deep knowledge of the plants available in this region. Ethnoecology is the governing theoretical framework, with ethnobotany being a subset of this and the primary focus of this paper.
Conclusions arising from this research include: there is limited knowledge as a modern colonised nation; what little knowledge there is left is ageing and will disappear; and, there is an urgent need to better understand what still grows in the region prior to further urban applications and this is also compounded by the driving forces of climate change. Accordingly this paper demonstrates the need to urgently undertake this research. The implications for ‘Tipping Points’ is that we are increasingly at the point of no return is when we forget about the indigenous knowledge base and watch the death of the knowledge holders, and their wisdom and its benefits have not been transposed into contemporary society.
ISBN 9780730000211
Language eng
Field of Research 120107 Landscape Architecture
Socio Economic Objective 950302 Conserving Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Heritage
HERDC Research category E1 Full written paper - refereed
ERA Research output type E Conference publication
Copyright notice ©2015, ISDRS
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30079694

Document type: Conference Paper
Collection: School of Architecture and Built Environment
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