You are not logged in.
Openly accessible

Applying a we al-li educaring framework to address histories of violence with Aboriginal women

Carnes, Roslyn 2015, Applying a we al-li educaring framework to address histories of violence with Aboriginal women, Deakin University, School of Law, Geelong, Vic..

Attached Files
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads
carnes-applyingawe-2015.pdf Published version application/pdf 9.14MB 30

Title Applying a we al-li educaring framework to address histories of violence with Aboriginal women
Author(s) Carnes, RoslynORCID iD for Carnes, Roslyn orcid.org/0000-0002-9133-0608
Publication date 2015
Total pages 22
Publisher Deakin University, School of Law
Place of Publication Geelong, Vic.
Keyword(s) link between intergenerational trauma/violence and incarceration
prison education
Northern Territory
Summary An Aboriginal woman living in a remote area is 45 times more likely to experience domestic violence than their white peers. (Gordon et al, 2002) The nature of that violence is multi-layered, complex and incorporates a history of intergenerational loss, grief, trauma and the impact of colonisation, as discussed by Atkinson, C (2008). It involves women, children, families, communities. It is a story about people, many of whom find themselves in trouble with the legal system. Of the 25 male parents who killed their children in a domestic violence context five identified as Aboriginal (20%) (NSW Domestic Violence Death Review Team Annual Report, 2015, p.17). The percentage of women in Victorian prisons who have been victims of sexual, physical or emotional abuse has been reported to be 87% (Johnson, 2004). This figure is supported by the latest Ombudsman’s report on Victorian Prisons (2015).None of the 17 females who killed their children identified as Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander (NSW Domestic Violence Death Review Team Annual Report 2015, p.18). The most common charge/offence for both Aboriginal men and women is an act intended to cause injury (see Figure 2).The stories of women in this program and anecdotal evidence from people working in the field reveals that most of this violence is lateral, ie within families and communities which is not an uncommon occurrence where there is a history of colonisation.
Notes We Al-li were contracted by the Kunga Family Violence Program to provide 20 days training to a group of ten women in Alice Springs Correction Centre (ASCC) in the month of September, 2015. The programme ran from Monday to Friday from 9am to 3pm. We Al-li was chosen to deliver this program because of the understanding of intergenerational trauma that underlies much of the experiences of intergenerational violence experienced by many Aboriginal women. Also, the reputation of We Al-li and Judy Atkinson in delivering such packages was well known. Permission was granted by the Superintendent of the ASCC for course materials to be taken into the prison each day. Each woman was provided with a manual for each unit, a book for journaling, a range of colouring pencils and pencils. A wide range of art materials were also provided for use each day, these remained in the training area. The evaluator was contracted by We Al-li to evaluate the Educaring programme in the context of the Kunga Family Violence Programme in the ASCC.
Language eng
Field of Research 189999 Law and Legal Studies not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 970116 Expanding Knowledge through Studies of Human Society
HERDC Research category A5 Minor research monograph
Copyright notice ©2015, Deakin University, School of Law
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30079700

Document type: Book
Collections: Law
Open Access Collection
Connect to link resolver
 
Unless expressly stated otherwise, the copyright for items in DRO is owned by the author, with all rights reserved.

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.

Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 0 times in TR Web of Science
Scopus Citation Count Cited 0 times in Scopus
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Access Statistics: 29 Abstract Views, 30 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Thu, 19 Nov 2015, 17:22:55 EST

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.