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The implications of contractualism for the responsibilisation of higher education

Rawolle, Shaun, Rowlands, Julie and Blackmore, Jill 2017, The implications of contractualism for the responsibilisation of higher education, Discourse: studies in the cultural politics of education, vol. 38, no. 1, pp. 109-122, doi: 10.1080/01596306.2015.1104856.

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Title The implications of contractualism for the responsibilisation of higher education
Author(s) Rawolle, ShaunORCID iD for Rawolle, Shaun orcid.org/0000-0002-7514-0660
Rowlands, JulieORCID iD for Rowlands, Julie orcid.org/0000-0003-1664-4209
Blackmore, JillORCID iD for Blackmore, Jill orcid.org/0000-0002-1049-2788
Journal name Discourse: studies in the cultural politics of education
Volume number 38
Issue number 1
Start page 109
End page 122
Total pages 14
Publisher Taylor & Francis
Place of publication Abingdon, Eng.
Publication date 2017
ISSN 1469-3739
Keyword(s) responsibilisation
contractualism
risk
higher education
academic workload
doctoral supervision
Summary Within the context of heightened perceptions of risk within thehigher education sector worldwide, responsibility for outcomes isincreasingly required not only of universities but, also, ofindividual academics. In turn, contracts have become a key formof governance for institutions in mediating and modulating thisrisk and responsibility. While much writing around the use ofcontracts in higher education has focused on market-based,competitive neoliberal conceptions of contractualism, thisarticle argues that there are, in fact, two largely antagonisticnew modes of contractualism – market contractualism andrelational contractualism – and a third, residual mode, paternalcontractualism. These three modes of contractualism coexistwithin universities, in tension. The article draws on two Australianexemplars to highlight how these tensions play out and tohighlight the potential for contractualism to create spaces forshared goals and projects and shared risks resulting from theways in which responsibility and individual agency are negotiated.
Language eng
DOI 10.1080/01596306.2015.1104856
Field of Research 130103 Higher Education
Socio Economic Objective 930501 Education and Training Systems Policies and Development
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2015, Informa
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30079759

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Education
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