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Traversing myths and mountains: addressing socioeconomic inequities in the promotion of nutrition and physical activity behaviours

Ball, Kylie 2015, Traversing myths and mountains: addressing socioeconomic inequities in the promotion of nutrition and physical activity behaviours, International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, vol. 12, no. 142, pp. 1-7, doi: 10.1186/s12966-015-0303-4.

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Title Traversing myths and mountains: addressing socioeconomic inequities in the promotion of nutrition and physical activity behaviours
Author(s) Ball, KylieORCID iD for Ball, Kylie orcid.org/0000-0003-2893-8415
Journal name International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity
Volume number 12
Issue number 142
Start page 1
End page 7
Total pages 7
Publisher BioMed Central
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2015
ISSN 1479-5868
Summary BACKGROUND: In developed countries, individuals experiencing socioeconomic disadvantage - whether a low education level, low income, low-status occupation, or living in a socioeconomically disadvantaged neighbourhood - are less likely than those more advantaged to engage in eating and physical activity behaviours conducive to optimal health. These socioeconomic inequities in nutrition and physical activity (and some sedentary) behaviours are graded, persistent, and evident across multiple populations and studies. They are concerning in that they mirror socioeconomic inequities in obesity and in health outcomes. Yet there remains a dearth of evidence of the most effective means of addressing these inequities. People experiencing disadvantage face multiple challenges to healthy behaviours that can appear insurmountable. With increasing recognition of the role of underlying structural and societal factors as determinants of nutrition and physical activity behaviours and inequities in these behaviours, and the limited success of behaviour change approaches in addressing these inequities, we might wonder whether there remains a role for behavioural scientists to tackle these challenges. DISCUSSION: This debate piece argues that behavioural scientists can play an important role in addressing socioeconomic inequities in nutrition, physical activity and sedentary behaviours, and that this will involve challenging myths and taking on new perspectives. There are successful models for doing so from which we can learn. Addressing socioeconomic inequities in eating, physical activity and sedentary behaviours is challenging. However, successful examples demonstrate that overcoming such challenges is possible, and provide guidance for doing so. Given the disproportionate burden of ill health carried by people experiencing socioeconomic disadvantage, all our nutrition and physical activity interventions, programs and policies should be designed to reach and positively impact these individuals at greatest need.
Language eng
DOI 10.1186/s12966-015-0303-4
Field of Research 110699 Human Movement and Sports Science not elsewhere classified
111199 Nutrition and Dietetics not elsewhere classified
11 Medical And Health Sciences
13 Education
Socio Economic Objective 920401 Behaviour and Health
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2015, BioMed Central
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30079797

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.