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High colonization by native arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) of rubber trees in small-holder plantations on low fertility soils in North East Thailand

Herrmann, Laetitia, Bräu, Lambert, Robin, Agnès, Robain, Henri, Wiriyakitnateekul, Wanpen and Lesueur, Didier 2016, High colonization by native arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) of rubber trees in small-holder plantations on low fertility soils in North East Thailand, Archives of agronomy and soil science, vol. 62, no. 7, pp. 1041-1048, doi: 10.1080/03650340.2015.1110238.

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Title High colonization by native arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) of rubber trees in small-holder plantations on low fertility soils in North East Thailand
Author(s) Herrmann, Laetitia
Bräu, Lambert
Robin, Agnès
Robain, Henri
Wiriyakitnateekul, Wanpen
Lesueur, Didier
Journal name Archives of agronomy and soil science
Volume number 62
Issue number 7
Start page 1041
End page 1048
Total pages 8
Publisher Taylor and Francis
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2016
ISSN 0365-0340
1476-3567
Summary Rubber tree is a very important crop in Thailand, representing an essential source of income for farmers. In the past two decades, rubber tree plantations have been greatly expanding in unfavorable areas, where climate conditions are difficult and soil fertility is very poor. To optimize latex yields, mineral fertilizers have been widely used. A better understanding of the roles of the biological compartment in soil fertility is essential to determine alternative management practices to sustain soil fertility and optimize latex yields. Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) are widely recognized as beneficial for plants, mainly through their role in improving plant nutrient uptake. The objective of this study was to assess the AMF populations in rubber tree plantations and the impact of both soil characteristics and plantation age on these communities. Our results showed that all rubber trees were highly colonized, regardless of the soil structure and nutrient contents. AMF colonization was not affected by the age of the trees, suggesting that maintaining the symbiosis is likely to be beneficial at all stages. A better understanding and management of the microbial communities would contribute to maintaining or restoring soil fertility, leading to a better tree growth and optimized latex yield.
Language eng
DOI 10.1080/03650340.2015.1110238
Field of Research 070508 Tree Nutrition and Physiology
060505 Mycology
060504 Microbial Ecology
Socio Economic Objective 820199 Forestry not elsewhere classified
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2015, Taylor and Francis
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30079958

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Life and Environmental Sciences
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